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What are your​ most versatile tools?

 
Posts: 20
Location: Northern Kentucky
3
forest garden homestead
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I wanted to know what everyone's favorite versatile multi tools.


My favorites right now,

6 inch grub hoe- practically replaces all my other hoes, my shovel, my mattock, and rake in most situations.

20 inch concrete rake- does a better job raking out big dirt clods and leveling than a rock rake. Useful as a wide hoe in loose soils and the hook on the backside digs nice little furrows for planting seeds.

Russian plezkorez hoe- awesome for detail weeding and a useful alternative to a pointed hoe for digging furrows for seeds.

Hand held mattock- quick and easy planting of transplants.

Hari Kari knife- has replaced most of my hand held garden tools for most tasks.

What are your favorites and what tasks do they make easier?
 
gardener
Posts: 3048
Location: Central Texas zone 8a
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Once i started carrying a knife, it became a valuable tool. So much so that I broke 2 of them. One using as a screwdriver, the other digging holes for transplants(used its leverage to pop out a small rock).

I ended up hammering my own knife from a plow and it takes a beating daily.

My cedar eater is  basically a pruner that can cut flush to the ground while standing up. I use it to clear baby junipers , thorny vines, and other small debris.  It can also   be used over head, just not as quickly. I am clearing out a thicket in a ravine and replanting with fruit and nut trees. This does it at a relaxing pace.
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pollinator
Posts: 558
Location: Western Canadian mtn valley, zone 6b, 750mm (30") precip
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Living on land, many tools are necessary, but maybe not as obviously “versatile” as others.  These I'm listing are some that occurred to me straight off as super versatile.  Some are more basic (low tech) than others, of course…

long-handled spade shovel

axe

wheelbarrow

tape measure

16-oz claw hammer

18v cordless drill

oxy-acetylene torch rig

4-wheel-drive pickup
 
pollinator
Posts: 106
Location: New Zealand
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My most used tool;

machete
tree planting spade
14 ton Doosan excavator
 
pollinator
Posts: 685
Location: northwest Missouri, USA
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Without a doubt, not even close, my most used and useful tool on my homestead is my cordless electric hammer drill. So many applications, so many times it has made my projects possible. I love my Kubota tractor, but the number of times I've gone to my cordless electric hammer drill is ridiculous.
 
pollinator
Posts: 311
Location: 7b at 1050 feet, precipitation average 13 inches, irrigated, Okanagan Valley
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My most versatile tools are my hands!
 
pollinator
Posts: 117
Location: The Ocala National Forest. Florida, USA
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Number one has to be my pocket knife. Current one has a small straight blade and Phillips screw driver on it and has saved countless steps. Then in no particular order, shovel, pitch fork, wheel barrow, post hole diggers... All used regularly... The cordless drill, loppers, chain saw, axe, hammer... Prob next most used.
 
Posts: 244
Location: Wales, UK
5
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My billhook gets a lot of use throughout the winter months; coppicing, hedge laying, snedding trees... A hook that's fits your hand perfectly and is just the right weight for you makes for a joyful tool using experience!

Other tools I find to be versatile are mattocks, knives, spades and wheelbarrows. A pry bar or digging bar has come in handy many times when extra leverage has been required too.

Oh, and fencing pliers can come in handy too.
 
Posts: 14
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My grub hoe is at the top of the list. I bought it mainly for saplings, but it makes short work of any unwanted growth, including english ivy and blackberry. Also great for digging and mounding up beds. Next on the list is the 3-prong, long-handled cultivator, also good for raking and moving prickly trimmings and yard waste.
 
pollinator
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Mine is my Wallenstein Log Trailer. It is expensive, but it is a Homesteader Jackknife. It cost more then the tractor that pulls it, but well worth it. There is not one day that goes by that I do not use it. It is...

Log Loader Trailer
Grader
1 Cubic Yard Dump Trailer
Post Hole Driller
Upside Down Firewood Splitter
Feller-Buncher
Back Hoe
Seed Sower
Lifts and hauls round bales
Builds fence


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pollinator
Posts: 223
Location: Western North Carolina - Zone 7B stoney
60
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Mine is a stronghold haywire klamper.  It uses wire to fasten nearly anything together.
 
I got this tall by not having enough crisco in my diet as a kid. This ad looks like it had plenty of shortening:
Paul Wheaton's Permaculture and Homesteading Stuff
https://permies.com/w/stuff
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