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What are everybody's favorite or most necessary tools?

 
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I am just getting started and would love the feedback. Thanks 👍
 
pollinator
Posts: 11740
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Lately my essential tools are:

Battery electric chainsaw
Heavy duty loppers
Rake
Mattock
Shovel
Small hoe-rake combo tool
5 gallon buckets
Wheelbarrow
Garden shears
Piece of 1/2 inch hardware cloth to sift with
 
pollinator
Posts: 294
Location: West Virginny and Kentuck
92
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One can never have too many 5 gallon buckets, eh?
 
Posts: 71
Location: Northwest Missouri
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My battery powered reciprocating saw with pruner blade! Nothing can beat it for cleaning up fence lines. So much more convenient that getting out the chain saw for light work. Also have an O handle digging fork that's super handy.  
 
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I use a hori hori for lots of things in our garden, but my favorite tool has to be the pick maddock. Regular old pruners are fun to carry around, too, when I'm just putzing around.
 
                    
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My garden seat/kneeler thing I picked up at a yard sale. Not so much for sitting or kneeling, but for getting back up off the ground. I could use a dozen of the things, strategically placed around the garden.
 
pollinator
Posts: 280
Location: Monticello Florida zone 8a
75
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Cordless drill for screws and holes. Those two tasks can be quite difficult with a screwdriver or hand crank auger.
 
gardener
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What I use most are my knives, hammers, power drill/screw gun, leaf blower, water hoses, pliers, heavy wire snips, post driver, digging pole, screwdrivers, come-along, pallet buster, and my heavy duty wagon, with the drop sides.
 
gardener
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Location: Pacific Wet Coast
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For a woman, I strongly recommend a set of vice grips. I was using a pair this evening to hold something still while I installed some nylocks. I can use them for cutting wire by tightening them a 1/2 turn with each squeeze, when there is simply no way I could just squeeze pliers and get it cut.
 
Carla Burke
gardener
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Jay Angler wrote:For a woman, I strongly recommend a set of vice grips. I was using a pair this evening to hold something still while I installed some nylocks. I can use them for cutting wire by tightening them a 1/2 turn with each squeeze, when there is simply no way I could just squeeze pliers and get it cut.



That reminds me! Clamp! Slide clamps, C clamps - I need to pick some up! They become pretty much an extra set of hands, when you're building stuff, and can save the hands you have when you're cutting stuff.
 
Posts: 33
Location: Wilderness, South Africa
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A file for sharpening blades. Because a blunt tool is a dangerous tool. A nice handfile is easy to slip into your pocket for sharpening on the go.
 
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First time on. Last year my wife bought me the Hori Hori knife . Never saw a garden tool like it before . Needless to say but I love this tool . In the yard it is always strapped to my side . The uses are endless . I would always be looking for different tools but this knife saves me many trips to the shed . I also notice that having a knife that size strapped to me keeps strangers off my property ☺
 
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Depends on what you're doing. For me, if I'm woodworking, it's planes and chisels and knives and handsaws, if I'm clearing, then it's machetes, chainsaws and axes/hatchets. I like edged tools... =)
 
gardener
Posts: 3295
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
815
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My most favorite tool of all is COMMON SENSE!  It 's not to common anymore... The work place rule of take 5 to think things over and figure out the easy, SAFE way of accomplishing your task is a good way to work.
Other than that ...
Mattox, chainsaw, shovels, pointed and flat, 6' digging bar, posthole diggers (very handy for any hole) rakes hard tine and spring tine.  sawsall (cordless is nice),pry bars of different sizes..
Wood working tools, saws, hammers ,drills.
A impact screw gun/driver (super dooper important) and quick release bits to fit it.
Auto tools) Floor jack , 1/2" cordless impact for changing tires.
A tractor with bucket is invaluable.
A snowplow in the north country saves lots of money.
 
pollinator
Posts: 968
Location: Denmark 57N
249
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Tools by use..
WHEELBARROW! That and buckets most certainly the most used items round here.
A belt knife in a leather sheath that was once upon a time a confirmation present to my grandfather
Dutch Hoe
Rake
Garden fork
Spade
Drill
Hand saw


.. after this we get down to things like hedgeclipper, rotovator, chainsaw that are only used a few times a year
 
Posts: 17
Location: 7b Western NC
1
forest garden trees
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My Leatherman multi tool has been a life saver many times, and is great for every day carry. Used to rebuild business equipment in the field when my tool box was in the warehouse and not in the truck. This saved me an entire day off.  Used for minor adjustments and car repairs. Used in the office to repair a colleagues damaged phone charger cord when they were experiencing a family emergency. Used in the field for tractor adjustments, cutting bail wire, etc.   Replaced an electrical receptacle at the house.  There are others I cant quickly recall.         The other tool is a very heavy, very sturdy, very expensive, full strap diamond point tree spade.  It cuts roots and most importantly does not fold in half or break the handle when under extreme stress.     For land clearing, my combo hoe/rake (AM Leonard or Rogue type)  again, not a 15 dollar hoe.
 
Carla Burke
gardener
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Yup - gloves! Without good gloves, chances are you won't be using anything else, for very long, at a time. I have 'goating' gloves (once my buck has touched them, I don't want them on anything else, lol), 'bloody' gloves (this is a new addition, for hauling animal carcasses around, during hunting season), general working around the house & barn gloves, spare gloves, emergency gloves in the cars...
 
Posts: 47
Location: Pine, Colorado
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+1 to mattock, 5 gallon buckets, and an endless supply of work gloves

Also nothing like a sharp chainsaw that is running well so +1 to files
 
gardener & author
Posts: 1355
Location: Tasmania
707
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For establishing my homestead, some of the things I use a lot are:

Pruning saw, for cutting down scrub
Long-handled plumbers shovel
Broadfork
Hand trowel, for planting out seedlings
5 gallon buckets, useful for lots of things

My husband uses a chainsaw regularly, because we have trees here for firewood. For land without firewood trees it probably wouldn't be be used much.
 
Jay Angler
gardener
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Location: Pacific Wet Coast
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Kate Downham wrote:

My husband uses a chainsaw regularly, because we have trees here for firewood. For land without firewood trees it probably wouldn't be be used much.

I had to convince my hubby to buy a chainsaw, and after a few years and a few storms, he decided I was right. After he bought it, I bought him a safety helmet with a metal visor to go with.
 
Kate Downham
gardener & author
Posts: 1355
Location: Tasmania
707
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Jay Angler wrote:Kate Downham wrote:

My husband uses a chainsaw regularly, because we have trees here for firewood. For land without firewood trees it probably wouldn't be be used much.

I had to convince my hubby to buy a chainsaw, and after a few years and a few storms, he decided I was right. After he bought it, I bought him a safety helmet with a metal visor to go with.



We got ours when there was a deal on to get free safety gear with the chainsaw. It didn't come with a helmet, but the glasses and chaps that were in it have been good for safety. He also ended up getting a sharpening kit later on, which has been good for getting a longer life out of chains and putting less strain on the bar and motor.
 
eco-innovator
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Since I started working with Truly Garden and simultaneously discovered the Hori Hori knife, it has become my favorite garden tool.  My husband takes off with it mostly.  It was particularly useful when I dug horseradish at the end of the season.

Here is a coupon for Buy 2 Get 1 Free for Truly Garden & Loma Creek.  We carry quite a few of the tools mentioned in this thread.

Now through Xmas 2019!  Use Code TGB2G12019 to Buy Any 2 Truly Garden or Loma Creek Products and Get 1 Free!

Coupon Valid both at Amazon or on our Truly Garden Website!
 
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Last Christmas my college-age son searched Reddit for a gardening gift idea for me, and the Truly Garden Hori Hori knife was recommended. It's my favorite tool because it was an unexpected gift from him, but it's also my most used tool. It's easy to carry around and performs many gardening tasks.
 
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My small wheelbarrow, trowel and shovel, nippers are most useful tools for me.
 
pollinator
Posts: 3513
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
59
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My favorite tool was, until I broke it, was an old military folding shovel that I replaced the handle with one big enough to be a walking stick.  It had a shovel and a pick, both could fold flat against the shaft, out at 90, or straight out.  Shovel, hoe, pick, and I sharpened the side so it worked like a machete/hatchet.  It was a really handy tool for walking the land and weeding and transplanting and hooking tall branches to reach the last apple.
 
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