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Cob Stables  RSS feed

 
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Hi, I'm based in Nottinghamshire and currently saving to be able to buy a plot of land next spring/summer in order to build a cob house. To get around planning permission, I'm hoping to use the land to train horses and sell on, as well as having my own vegetable plot. That way I can prove I am making a living off the land.

I'm hoping to be able to build a stable with an annexe first, then move onto the larger build at a later date. I really want to build the stables in a barn style, out of cob/and timber frame as it allows me to get used to the material and make any tweaks necessary before building the main house. Plus its cheaper and looks much nicer.

If anyone has any experience on cob outbuildings/stables/barns I would really love to hear from you as there is very little information on these types of builds which utilise cob as a material, I've only read/researched about cob houses.

look forward to hearing from you
 
pollinator
Posts: 2184
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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forest garden trees urban
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Neat ideas.
Round here, boarding horses is a great way to make money.
The horses owner is expected to provide feed and care, the owner of the stables provides the building and bedding.

I have no experience, but I'm curious what advice rolls in.
The usual "good set of boots" should take care of the wetness horses might bring.
 
Posts: 614
Location: Bendigo , Australia
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dog homestead
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The use of cob in stables is exactly the same as for homes.
Obviously kick boards may need to be installed.
Using a timber frame, the cob is used as infill panels to enclose the structure.
 
Rebecca Daws
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books dog woodworking
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Similar concept here too with owners having to buy and provide feed for their horses, I know I can get horses pretty cheap at market too to buy and hopefully bring on to be good all round horses.

I did wonder if I might have to look at a timber frame, plus I love the look of the timber/cob mixed homes. Thanks, I know what I need to starting learning and researching next
 
pollinator
Posts: 271
Location: Stevensville, Montana; Zone 5b
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food preservation forest garden hugelkultur
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I'm seconding the good boots as the horse will muck it up good inside and around the building. I would build the footer up at least two feet if not a bit higher. If you are doing an infill building I would suggest doing a light straw cob build as it is much easier to build up. Cob is stronger for load strength, but the light straw infill would build up much faster, be just as inexpensive and not be nearly as heavy. Good luck, sounds like a fun project.
 
Rebecca Daws
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books dog woodworking
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Yeah I was thinking of doing a good earthen floor (preferably in a dark shade) to prevent the floor looking too mucky and utilising kickboards  to at least cover 1/2 of the wall to protect the interior.

Am I right in thinking that for the infill system the timber frame has to be lifted first, then the straw is used to build up the walls? I know cob itself works better for rounded rooms rather than square, so I would imagine for a stable or barn; which is typically square, the walls would be stronger utilising the straw infill method.
 
John C Daley
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Location: Bendigo , Australia
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That is correct
Frame, then infill walls
Earth floors maybe need thinking about, it may need to be firm and dry
I have seen a few stables and they seem to have self draining concrete or paved floors
 
pollinator
Posts: 404
Location: Derbyshire, UK
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*waves* from the Nottinghamshire/Derbyshire border!
 
Rebecca Daws
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haha waving back!



 
Do the next thing next. That’s a pretty good rule. Read the tiny ad, that’s a pretty good rule, too.
How to Make Your Own Emergency Home Battery Bank
https://permies.com/wiki/38548/Emergency-Home-Battery-Bank
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