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HELP! unknown fungus(i think) in blueberry soil

 
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Hi!
My blueberry plant recently started sprouting these weird brown ball things in the soil. Nothing on the plant. Its only in the soil. I removed them all and they were back with a vengence within days. Anybody know what they are?!
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pollinator
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Location: Zone 8b Portland
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I’m not sure what they are but woody plants like blueberries prefer a fungal dominated soil mix. I wouldn’t worry too much about it. The plants looks generally healthy to me.
 
master steward
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Maybe this:

L. (Morganella) pyriforme - the only one to grow on wood or buried wood, but that may not be obvious. Not spiny. Pear shaped, with distinct white base flesh that doesn't turn colour, and white rhizomorphs.




http://www.alpental.com/psms/PNWMushrooms/PictorialKey/Gastroid.htm


 
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Location: In the woods, West Coast USA
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It does look like a type of fungi that shows the soil is rich and healthy.   Some of the best soil additive I ever got was mushroom compost, it has amazing biology in it.

But don't eat these, they aren't that kind of mushroom!!
 
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Blueberries need constantly moister soil than most other plants. Fungi only thrives in moist soil. So you've got the water part spot on.
 
gardener
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Those are one of the many species of puff ball fungi, they are indicating to you that your blueberry roots are thriving.

As has been mentioned blueberries require fungi hyphae (mycelium) to get all the nutrients they need for good growth and berry production, so you are doing well.
Also, as has been mentioned, these are not edibles, so just enjoy knowing your soil is really benefiting your  blue berry bush and your going to get good crops as the result.

If you have other bushes that don't have evidence of the mycelium, simply take a bit of that plant's soil and add it to the needy ones, within a short time they too will have the fungi in the soil helping the bushes out.

Redhawk
 
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