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Can Anyone Tell Me If This is an Edible Apple?

 
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Good morning, Everyone!

My wife and I recently rented a farm to live on. Early this spring we discovered what appeared to be four different apple trees in an overgrown grove of trees. All four trees had been planted in a row. We couldn't believe our good fortune be a use I love making crabapples cider each fall.

As the fruits developed, the fruit on one tree in particular grew rather small and though they LOOK like apples, if they are apples then they certainly must be the tiniest apples on the face of the earth!

Anyway so here are a few pics to help you figure this one out.

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Magnus Jorgensen
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I forgot to point out that we live in central eastern Alberta, Canada. I THINK we are on the edge between growing zones 3 and 4 but I'm not entirely sure.

Best,
Magnus.
 
gardener & bricolagier
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Personally, I'd nibble one. They look like crabapples to me, and I'd see if I liked them. Teeny tiny bite in case they are sour. But they look like apples to me, and as far as I know, there are no toxic apples out there except Manchineel  Wikipedia Manchineel  Manchineel grows in swampy brackish water and has sap that burns you. Birds and animals will not eat them, if the birds like your apples, and you are not on the coast in a swamp, I'd say taste them.
Tell us what you find out!
Welcome to Permies! Lots to learn, and it's fun! :)
 
Pearl Sutton
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We were typing at the same time. Canada does not have Manchineel. I'd taste them!
 
Magnus Jorgensen
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And I also forgot to point out that I know almost nothing about growing things but this looks like an incredible site to learn from!

Magnus.
 
Magnus Jorgensen
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Thanks both of you for your input.

I HAVE tested them. I tend to taste before asking -- not a terribly safe way to live, mind you. They taste sour like you'd expect a crabapples to taste but I just don't have enough knowledge about these things to know.

So I've probably got me 4 crabapples trees instead of 3. I'm so damned happy I could just squeal!
Thanks you guys.

Best,
Magnus.
 
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Magnus,   The little crabapples you have make a great jam/jelly after you get a few frosts to help them sweeten a bit.  Mind you the little ones like what you have shown tend not to be too sweet, but add a sweetener of your choice to the cooked pulp along with perhaps a bit of pectin and they will provide good flavor on toast or other item.  Also, if you plan on adding more apple or fruit trees to your location, the University of Manitoba has a reputable breeding and selection program for such stock for the north central provinces.  Good luck!
 
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If you know of any "conventional" apple  trees nearby, you might want to try your hand at grafting.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Magnus Jorgensen:
Yay for crabapples!!
And yes, there IS a lot to learn here, hope you hang around if you have a farm and need information. Look up the basic idea of Permaculture and you'll see what we are aiming for: healthy, not chemical grown, awesome tasting produce! It's interesting and really makes farming different, and SO MUCH better tasting.
 
girl power ... turns out to be about a hundred watts. But they seriously don't like being connected to the grid. Tiny ad:
permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
https://permies.com/wiki/bootcamp
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