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Tiny wagon project

 
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Hi Permies

After a bit of advice regarding a stove installation for my wagon.

The wagon is an old German bauwagon built around 60 years ago. I need to get it ready for winter so I'm going to stick with the trusted wood burner as I have been given one for free, plus all the pipe work.

My question is regarding the hearth. The floor has been covered in laminate over the original wooden planks and I want to know if I can just go ahead and build my brick hearth right on top of the laminate.

I had planned to set the bricks on an inch of sandy cob mix to level them out, and secure them in place.

Would it be better to use a different product to bed them in rather than cob? Say cement for example. I want to keep the costs of materials down to a minimum, but also want to do a proper job we have tons of clay on-site that was once the render for the brick barn, so it would be great to reuse some of it!

Thank you in advance for any insights.

Davey.  
 
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I want to keep the costs of materials down to a minimum, but also want to do a proper job



These two are rarely compatible, make a choice first.
 
gardener
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Hi Davey, they make an insulated cement board and one common application is to use it for electric in-floor heating in tile floors. Perhaps this may be something to consider as a first layer for your hearth. Hope this helps!
 
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We need pictures ... please!
 
Davey Jones
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Here it is:)
Bricks all cut and placed out. Laminate flooring can be seen in the lower part of the image.

I believe it is possible to do a job properly on a limited budget. It's all about being resourceful and doing the correct research, plus a little bit of creative thinking

Cheers all!

Davey
 
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Is your wagon intended to be mobile, or will it stay where it is now? If it doesn't have to stand the vibration of moving, I would think cob would be a fine material to bed the hearth bricks in. Depending on how high the stove is from its base, you might really want to use some spacers to support a piece of cement board an inch off the floor before bedding the bricks, so air can circulate below it and carry excess heat away to avoid any possibility of overheating the floorboards.
You will also need a metal shield with airspace behind it to protect the wall(s) near the stove.
 
Davey Jones
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Glenn Herbert wrote:Is your wagon intended to be mobile, or will it stay where it is now? If it doesn't have to stand the vibration of moving, I would think cob would be a fine material to bed the hearth bricks in. Depending on how high the stove is from its base, you might really want to use some spacers to support a piece of cement board an inch off the floor before bedding the bricks, so air can circulate below it and carry excess heat away to avoid any possibility of overheating the floorboards.
You will also need a metal shield with airspace behind it to protect the wall(s) near the stove.



The wagon might well be moved at some point in the future, but it shall mainly be stood up for the majority of its life with me.

There is a 6cm gap from the base and inside the stove, is a grate so the fire won't sit directly on the bottom of the stove. I'm thinking that the bricks and cob should be enough to keep the heat away from the floor.

Thanks for your input Glenn
 
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