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Anthelmintic trees for goats, temperate climate. What works against worms (the parasites)?

 
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Hi,
I am looking for anthelmintic trees and shrubs which can be fed to goats: for now I have found an interesting article listing many plants which were used in Nordic countries for their anti-parasitic properties. Check out table 1, it is too long to copy.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2202332/
They have a disclaimer that it is just historical records, and plants may be ineffective or dangerous.
Tannins (contained in oak for example,) are also being tested.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19961649
https://coms.events/GA2017/data/abstracts/en/abstract_0284.html
Tannins are more of a preventive than a cure it seems.
Does anyone have experiences with plants (shrubs and trees especially) for worming goats? Or found some interesting articles?
Best
Hans
 
pollinator
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I'm not sure about particular plants for reducing parasites, but I think adding some food-grade diatomaceous earth to their fodder could help. Overgrazing can increase parasites since they're eating stuff they pooped on.
 
steward
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I grow tobacco for my local goat lady. She feeds it to her goats for deworming.
tobacco-flower.jpg
[Thumbnail for tobacco-flower.jpg]
Tobacco
 
hans muster
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Thanks for the replies. Joseph, do you know how much/how often she gives the tobacco? And what kind of tobacco is it?
Best
 
pollinator
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I have heard that some cypresses and cedars are often chosen by goats themselves when they are in need of a worming. There are people on this site that have used them intentionally, by simply allowing their goats access to cedar in their browsing. They apparently take what they need and move on. The caveat that I have heard is that it will impart the taste of the cedar or cypress in their milk and meat, but I think this only likely if it makes up a portion of their regular grazing, not just their medicine cabinet.

As to parasite control, I have heard great things about breaking the parasite loop on the pasture by overgrazing with poultry a number of days after the goats, such that any larvae hatch and can be gobbled up by the hungry birds.

Let us know how it goes, and good luck.

-CK
 
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I was wondering if Kate Downham could offer us some tips....

If the list above is for cold areas, well I am subtropical, so we do not even have the cold to kill pests!

I have taken goats and sheep recently, and they are skinny and I found a few "white stuff" that look like tenia though it was not flat.... Maybe if they are really infested I should give some "chemical2 for a start? I don't know how bad are those products, maybe not that much?
 
Xisca Nicolas
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Joseph Lofthouse wrote:I grow tobacco for my local goat lady. She feeds it to her goats for deworming.



Do they eat tobacco voluntarily??
 
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Xisca Nicolas wrote:I was wondering if Kate Downham could offer us some tips....

If the list above is for cold areas, well I am subtropical, so we do not even have the cold to kill pests!

I have taken goats and sheep recently, and they are skinny and I found a few "white stuff" that look like tenia though it was not flat.... Maybe if they are really infested I should give some "chemical2 for a start? I don't know how bad are those products, maybe not that much?



Can you grow mulberry there? The leaves of mulberry will help get rid of worms.

If you can grow either birds-foot trefoil, or big trefoil, these are smaller legumes, but they will work too, as will chicory.

If there are any grapes that will grow where you are, the vines and leaves can also be fed to goats for this purpose.

With those skinny new animals you mentioned, I would be looking at making sure their mineral levels (especially copper for the goats) are high enough. Do you know whether the soils in the local area you bought the animals from are deficient in copper or any other mineral? (I should warn you that copper can be toxic in high doses, especially for sheep and light-coloured goats).

Diatomaceous earth and garlic are wonderful things you can feed to your animals that will kill worms but won't harm the animals. Both of these are most affective if they're fed 2 days before the full moon, but if you're very worried about your animals, there's going to be no harm in doing it any time. You can either give a high monthly dose of them at the full moon (or twice-monthly), or you can give them a continuous course of it for three to six weeks in order to try and kill all the worm eggs.
 
Xisca Nicolas
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Yes we have mulberry! Mainly the black one, though I can also find the one used for silk, the white mulberry.... Are both of them good?

And yes we usually feed grape leaves to animals, I also give it to guinea pigs in summer. (I dont mind the fruits, as lizards eat all...)

Our soil is deficient in boron as far as I know.
It is volcanic.

About legumes, we have tedera - bitumina bituminosa - that they like and is studied as a medicine, even cancer. No idea if it has an antihelmentic effect...
 
Kate Downham
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I haven't read about any other legumes having this effect, only those trefoil ones that I mentioned.

That is great that you have mulberry there. The only ones I've seen here have been black mulberry (I've tried dried white ones and they are really tasty too). Any mulberry leaves will be great to help stop the worms, and as good goat food in general.
 
He's dead Jim. Grab his tricorder. I'll get his wallet and this tiny ad:
Heat your home with the twigs that naturally fall of the trees in your yard
http://woodheat.net
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