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alkaline Biochar?

 
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Hi,
I am new to biochar and I am looking into biochar providers. One that I have found nearby where I live sells a product that has a quite high pH (8.92 in water) and high conductivity (994 microS/cm) is this normal within good biochar products? (the material from where it was produced was dry pine wood).
Also I'd like to use it in the tree holes when planting them and the soil's pH is already somewhat alkaline 7.9 to 8.1 and I wonder if putting a dose of biochar there can have the (negative) effect  of raising the overall pH of the area just around where the trees are planted.
 
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As a chemist, I would say that high pH is completely typical for bio-char. The effects could be minimized somewhat by washing the charcoal before application. (And properly disposing of the waste water).
 
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One of the reasons that I use biochar is that our soils are naturally very acidic due to high rainfall.  For most plants, biochar improves nutrient availability, but I keep it away from blueberries and huckleberries.
johN S
PDX OR
 
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Yup, that's a very normal pH for fresh biochar, but after you put it through a composting cycle you should be all set.  Good luck!
 
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