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Why is it better not to cure bees at all. - English Subtitles

 
Posts: 30
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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The undeniable reasons why it is much better not to use any kind of drugs, not even the so-called organic ones, to cure our bees:



I greet you from Argentina.
 
pollinator
Posts: 643
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
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That was very interesting! I agree that leaving bees -- in fact, most animals -- alone to do what nature intended for them to do has to be the best way. We only have to look at the incredibly dependent nature of pet animals, who could never survive in good health without the food and other care we give them, to see that when humans start monkeying around with the genetics and habits of other creatures we generally make a mess of things.

As for our own health, I also agree that living away from cities and enjoying the fresh food, water and air of the countryside is a lot healthier. I only go into town once each year (sometimes only once in two years) and I have not been sick in years. Every year I hear people complaining about colds and flu or some "bug" going around, but I never get anything. My husband, who has to go to work in town 3 days each week, constantly comes home with tales of how half the employees where he works are out with some illness or other (usually in winter when people tend to be more cooped up in their tightly-sealed houses), yet he seldom catches anything. We live with the seasons. When it is hot, we are hot because we do not close up our house and air-condition it. When it is cold, we are generally a bit cold too because we don't seal everything up unhealthily tight and we only use a wood stove for heat. We spend most of our time outdoors -- even in winter -- if not working in the gardens or elsewhere on our homestead, then we're out walking in the woods just for fun. To top it off, we eat real food that we make from scratch every meal. Our vegetables and fruits come primarily from our organic gardens and eggs from our free-range hens. We bake our own bread and we do not eat meat. In my opinion, living close to the land, eating fresh, real food, getting plenty of outdoor exercise, and learning to acclimate yourself to the seasons as they occur is really all it takes to be strong and healthy.
 
Oscar Perone
Posts: 30
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Hi, Mrs. Deb Stephens.

You are an example and a testimony of what is expressed in this video, I thank you very much to offer us your opinion about it.

I greet you with respect, appreciation and gratitude from Argentina.
 
gardener
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Location: Pacific Wet Coast
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Hi Mr. Perone,

I agree particularly with your comment that "stress" enables disease. In BC, Canada, commercial chickens tend to be kept by the thousands in barns. When a form of bird flu broke out on the Lower Mainland, the government officials killed tens of thousands of chickens in the area, and confiscated small backyard flocks in the vicinity. Many of the commercial birds were infected, but NOT ONE of the small flock chickens that were autopsied had any sign of the disease. Backyard flocks usually have access to sunshine, fresh greens and bugs, and a low stress living situation. Just like the bees, their immune systems and health benefit from living naturally.

 
Oscar Perone
Posts: 30
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Hi Mr. Jay Angler, thanks for writing to me.

I agree with you, any human management in any of the techniques of food production tends to denaturalization, which is why I think that when the human being puts his hands, brutally messes up what was already well before he intervened.

I apologize for the mistakes, because I am translating by software.

I greet you from Argentina.
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