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Jackfruit tree from cuttings

 
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I have bought myself a jackfruit tree which was rooted from stem cutting.

It is a general procedure to always graft jackfruit trees to obtain the desired cultivar and it contains a taproot.

For mythical reasons I do not want to plant a grafted tree in my home garden.

So in order to obtain the good cultivar, I have to go for grafting and so I bought it. My question is, since this cutting rooted tree does not have a taproot, will the tree produce fruits if I plant it? Taproot a is essential for storing nutrients and it anchors tree deep into the soil. Will the tree get enough nutrients if I grow it without a taproot?
 
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Fig/Mulberry/Breadfruit/Jackfruit are all in the same family.

They all do well with just rooted cutting without any taproot, even with typhoons pasting thru.
I have personally rooted and grown quite a few of them.
Just like breadfruit grown from cutting it will develop a wonderful root system and do well, my only worry is that it will take a while before you will be able to harvest it.
Also transplant the cutting before it has grown more than 5 leaves even better if it only has only grown 3 leaves.
One tip is to bury it as deep as possible even a leaf or two.
Even better plant around 7 or so in the same hole and then train them to merge into one tree for earlier fruiting.
Most of my jackfruit exposure has been with the soft and sweet type and not with the open with a knife types, but there shouldn't be much of a difference.  
 
Saravanan Balaraman
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Hi, thanks for the information.

I am not sure about the open with a knife type you mentioned, my jackfruit tree that I bought is the type that produces the large fruits. See attached picture of the type of the big tree.



I will plant it as deep as possible like you said however it's been quite a while after it has rooted since it has grown over four feet tall.
images-(13).jpeg
[Thumbnail for images-(13).jpeg]
 
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my jackfruit has a fruit forming for the first time!
woohoo! (in toronto canada)
 
S Bengi
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Yes those are wonderful pictures of a jack-fruit tree.
In my area of the world they list jack fruit as either mushy and super sweet or "hard and regular sweet". Maybe you don't do that and that is okay, no something to be confused about.


S. Drone, so cool that you have jackfruit growing in Canada. How tall does it get and how big is your greenhouse?
They can be kept pruned to 8ft vs the usual 40ft+ that they want to grow to.
https://toptropicals.com/cgi-bin/garden_catalog/cat.cgi?uid=artocarpus_heterophyllus


 
s. drone
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well i just took a measurement, it is 4 feet tall
i plan on building a greenhouse but for now it is in the basement with my other tropicals
the just came inside not too long ago
so i guess i should start an orchard style prune in due time
i got the tree from floraexotica .ca
http://s253.photobucket.com/user/subsonicdrone/media/IMG_9582_zpsptg6z881.jpg.html
 
s. drone
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now there are two fruits forming
https://s253.photobucket.com/user/subsonicdrone/media/IMG_9725_zps2znu2wfd.jpg.html
 
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Aloha Saravanan, I agree with S Benji, all of the breadfruit and relatives will do fine without a taproot. If you donʻt want to graft, then the stem-cutting should be fine, they are grown that way all the time and produce fruit just fine.

One thing I am planning to try though is growing breadfruit and jackfruit from seedlings and letting some of them just become what they will as far as fruit and growth type, and see what we get. Some of the rest will be grafted to varieties to see if having the taproot can increase health, production, drought-resistance, and nutrient uptake from deeper in the ground, since they should develop the taproot. Much like what people are doing in temperate areas with fruit trees, I think the trees grown from seeds will have an advantage in a changing climate. It is just not done often because it is a lot easier to propagate them from cuttings. One thought is that since these species have been propagated asexually for so long, we need new varieties because the climate and conditions in the world are changing so much.
 
S Bengi
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While jackfruit have seeds, my breadfruits don't have any, so sadly only cutting.
There is breadnut. Which I think is basically breadfruit with seeds in it.
 
Joe Kern
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I have breadfruit grown from seeds, and some trees I can get seed from here in Hawaiʻi. It remains to be seen what the fruit will look like as they are still in pots and young. Some people say a lot of them will revert to breadnut (the probable ancestor) or partway in between. But breadnut is very useful, too! I should have said part of my planned experiment was to use breadnut as  a rootstock for breadfruit, because of its taproot.

Seeds are a great find in breadfruit, it could be a great new variety. I believe that one response to climate change should be to continue the work of the ancestors, of breeding new varieties when we need them.
 
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s. drone wrote:now there are two fruits forming
https://s253.photobucket.com/user/subsonicdrone/media/IMG_9725_zps2znu2wfd.jpg.html



Amazing!!!  How big if your pot and what temperatures do you have in your basement, please?  
 
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The seeds are edible when they are boiled . I was told this after we had jackfruit last week and threw all the seeds out. There is a nice specimen just as you enter our housing complex. But it's not mine to harvest.

The world's largest fruit. I saw one that was claimed to be more than 100 pounds .

At the public market, it is sold whole or in segments . Most people just buy a one or two kilogram piece of it.

It can produce in as little as three years if well cared for. They can produce as much as three tons of fruit on a middle-aged tree. That's probably more than the largest mangoes produce.
 
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