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Herbs used as orchard cover crops

 
pollinator
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I have converted the table 4.11 in Fukuoka-San's book "The Natural Way of Farming" into an Excel sheet and took a screen shot.



enjoy
4.11.jpg
[Thumbnail for 4.11.jpg]
Herbs used as orchard cover crops
 
pollinator
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When I think of herbs I think of aromatic seasoning plants:
mint/thyme family,
garlic/onion family
celery/dill/carrot family.
They host alot of predatory insect.

I do like the pea/legume family and diakon radish(mustard family).
 
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Very Nice excel sheet Gurkan, thank you for making that and posting the screen shot.

It should be mentioned that Fukuoka-San used the botanical definition of herb: "any seed-bearing plant which does not have a woody stem and dies down to the ground after flowering".
Thus, many here will look at his table and think vegetable or cover crop instead of herb,

There are many of the herbs (western sense of definition: "any plant with leaves, seeds, or flowers used for flavoring, food, medicine, or perfume".) That do well as understory plantings.

I have started some new medicinal garden spots with the hard to find herbs which will be used in medicines, these are going around all the fruit trees in our orchard area.
I have also planned to start our south slope as herb gardens for those specific plants that really want to grow in forest spaces.
 
Gurkan Yeniceri
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Thanks for the clarification Doctor :-)

Herbaceous plants, it is.

 
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Gurkan Yeniceri wrote:I have converted the table 4.11 in Fukuoka-San's book "The Natural Way of Farming" into an Excel sheet and took a screen shot.



enjoy

. What's grass for when cover cropping? It says weed control but don't they all weed control?  Do grass fix nitrogen like clover does? Or does nitrogen fixing even matter if grass has so much nutrients (think wheatgrass, has all mineral and nutrients known possible). My question is why would I ever include grass in my mix of cover crop when clover seems to offer me more benefits? Or do cover crop grow better when mixed up?
 
Bryant RedHawk
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hau Samuel, cover crops do far better when grown as a mix.
Why would someone want to monocrop a cover crop?
I use a blend of something around 20 different plant species for covers, four of them are clovers, buckwheat, alfalfa, cereal rye, fescue, annual rye, rape, seven top turnip and on and on.
The reason for this is to get variety and thus diversity along with the many different root growth patterns, bacteria diversity, fungal diversity, the more different plants that are used, the better the end result soil will be.

Redhawk
 
Samuel Kuo
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:hau Samuel, cover crops do far better when grown as a mix.
Why would someone want to monocrop a cover crop?
I use a blend of something around 20 different plant species for covers, four of them are clovers, buckwheat, alfalfa, cereal rye, fescue, annual rye, rape, seven top turnip and on and on.
The reason for this is to get variety and thus diversity along with the many different root growth patterns, bacteria diversity, fungal diversity, the more different plants that are used, the better the end result soil will be.

Redhawk

going off topic again but now my question is on the Fukuoka method of broadcasting seeds onto the cover crop. All these cover crop seems to have anti weed property, I think because they crowd area out before weed can take hold. So my thing with grass is that they grow so tightly that if you were to broadcast say for example tomato seeds onto grass, I'm not sure if tomatoes will ever be able to grow through the thick patch of grass. At least this is my current experiences with all the lawns I've seen. The soil underneath is tightly knit by the grass roots so it becomes hard. However clover don't seem to do this from my observation. They don't grow as tight as lawn and there are crevices in between where clovers grow and soil is soft. when seeds are broadcasted seeds can find a niche to grow in. My question is how to grow via seed balls methods when all these cover crop have "crowd out every other plant thus anti weed property"? And I'm thinking that clovers not being as anti weedy as grass is a better balance to have living mulch and to still be able to broadcast seeds onto.
 
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