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I really love Japanese plums!

The tangy skin combined with the sweet flesh makes them one of my favorite fruits!

What varieties do you enjoy the most?!
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garden master
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I've heard Santa Rosa is close to perfection, and I have a Santa Rosa plum that will hopefully produce its first crop this year.

Is anyone growing it that can attest to that, or have another really good variety?
 
pollinator
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I like Santa Rosa.  I like Satsuma a little better on the flavor side.

For the Pacific Northwest which can befinicky for pollination of Japanese plums, I have best success with Shiro plums, and I'm never disappointed with those big sweet white plums.
 
Steve Thorn
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I've heard Satsuma is really sweet and not tart, is that true?

I've got a Shiro planted and am excited about tasting the fruit soon!
 
Eric Thompson
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Steve Thorn wrote:I've heard Satsuma is really sweet and not tart, is that true?




Satsuma is sweet and also has a strong flavor profile.  You an tell they are ripe when you have to eat them over the sink
 
Steve Thorn
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Eric Thompson wrote:Satsuma is sweet and also has a strong flavor profile.  You can tell they are ripe when you have to eat them over the sink



Very neat! I love it when a fruit is that juicy!
 
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I have 20 plum trees and by far my favorite Japanese plum is Beauty.  I call it a kitchen sink plum because it is so juicy you will wear it if not bending over Personally I only have disdain for Santa Rosa, if I'm mowing and there's low hanging fruit to grab I'll have a bite to remind me why I'm not impressed but it is nothing I would go out of my way to eat.  Satsuma is pretty darn good it is a drier,(than Beauty) meatier plum.
 
pollinator
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I absolutely love Santa Rosa plums, but it's the plum I grew up with. Ours are super juicy, very good sweet/tart mix, excellent for ginger plum sauce for roasted duck, and very easy to grow. I like that they are plum colored, making jams and whatnot with other colors plums never have quite the appeal for me. I also like the apricot/plum crosses for that similar sweet/tart flavor, both pluots and apriums, but that's another story.
 
Steve Thorn
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gina kansas wrote:I have 20 plum trees and by far my favorite Japanese plum is Beauty.  I call it a kitchen sink plum because it is so juicy you will wear it if not bending over Personally I only have disdain for Santa Rosa, if I'm mowing and there's low hanging fruit to grab I'll have a bite to remind me why I'm not impressed but it is nothing I would go out of my way to eat.  Satsuma is pretty darn good it is a drier,(than Beauty) meatier plum.



I've heard Beauty blooms pretty late too, dodging late frosts!
Has that been true for you if you're growing it?
 
Steve Thorn
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Stacy Witscher wrote:I absolutely love Santa Rosa plums, but it's the plum I grew up with. Ours are super juicy, very good sweet/tart mix, excellent for ginger plum sauce for roasted duck, and very easy to grow. I like that they are plum colored, making jams and whatnot with other colors plums never have quite the appeal for me. I also like the apricot/plum crosses for that similar sweet/tart flavor, both pluots and apriums, but that's another story.



I love that juicy sweet/tart taste!

I never thought about using them in cooking, that sounds really good!

I like the pluots too, they have such amazing flavor!
 
Steve Thorn
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I heard recently that Beauty is really adaptable too, doing well in a large growing area, blooms for a long period, is self fertile, and productive, which I'm always glad to hear!
 
Here. Have a potato. I grew it in my armpit. And from my other armpit, this tiny ad:
Native Bee Guide by Crown Bees
https://permies.com/wiki/105944/Native-Bee-Guide-Crown-Bees
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