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Notching for PSP structures.

 
                          
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I haven't been able to find any clear imagery or diagrams detailing precisely how Oehler does his notching for the posts and girders in his PSP structures. I'd appreciate if anyone could point me in the right direction.
 
steward
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Howdy Proteus, welcome to permies!  Does it have to be Oehler's exact cuts ? There are a couple of threads about underground houses here on the forum that used a lot of Mikes ideas, maybe taking a look at them might show you what you are looking for?

HERE

AND HERE

 
                          
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Thanks for the welcome, Miles.
While the threads you linked to certainly contain a wealth of interesting information, I was unable to find what I was looking for (unless I somehow missed it).

I'm definitely not limited to Oehler's exact cuts, but it was his warning against improper notching that prompted me to ask this question. In his workshop videos, he explains a debilitating mistake he made, and how he corrected it, however, I am unable to ascertain exactly how his diagram would look on an actual log, and so I was hoping to gain some confirmation as to the proper method from those with experience before I attempt anything.

I'm including a picture from the DVD of his diagram that shows how he connects a post to a girder on the outer wall of his structure.
IMG_20190224_130113.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20190224_130113.jpg]
 
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Would jumbo mortise & tenons work for the kind of joinery you're looking for?
 
pollinator
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I was actually thinking the same thing, James.

The other idea that occurred to me was, and forgive me, I forget the name of the technique, Japanese wood joinery. Working pieces that large, the intricacy is easier to manage.

-CK
 
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The "high point" of the post would be on the exterior side of the girder log, so as the wall below pushes in and tries to push that post in as well, it catches on the girder. You could cut a notch in the girder so they fit together tight, then drill down through the girder and into the post, and hammer a piece of rebar in  to prevent any shifting.

If time permits, I hope to use mortise and tenon on the interior posts, which will be handling mostly downward force. I'm not sure a mortise and tenon would handle the inward pressure along the sides though.
 
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