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Wildflower to ID - wild quinine/American Feverfew  RSS feed

 
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I assume this is a wildflower.  It's down in my low pasture, near the Rattlesnake Master plants, all around the base of a bunch of volunteer American Persimmons. The soil is fairly shallow over rocks, but seems to be moist a lot. Patch of it maybe 80 feet in diameter. Any guesses what I have here? Oh, and the bees etc LOVE it!!
Thank you for help with this :D



 
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That is wild quinine (Parthenium integrifolium). We have it everywhere! It apparently was once used in the same way as real quinine -- hence the name. Since I have never had malaria, I don't know if it works for that or for fevers in general, but I do know it makes a great tick remover for when you are in the woods! It is especially useful for removing seed ticks (those microscopic little beggars you can feel but barely see). The hairy, almost sandpapery leaves will just scrape them off when you rub them over the infested area. I always pick a leaf from the first plant I see when out walking in the woods and just put it in my pocket -- just in case.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Oh COOL!! What a neat surprise!! I'll make sure it's protected down there then :)
Thank you!
:D
 
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Quinine is also used for leg cramps.  I buy tonic water for leg cramps because it has quinine as an ingredient.
 
Deb Stephens
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Anne Miller wrote:Quinine is also used for leg cramps.  I buy tonic water for leg cramps because it has quinine as an ingredient.



That is true quinine from the tropical plant. I'm not sure this would do the same thing. I would look it up in a reliable herbal book first.
 
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Pearl Sutton wrote:I ...
Thank you for help with this :D
....

Hi Pearl,

I saw your post and was going to use this site CalPhotos Plants to help identify your mystery plant...by the time I got around to it, you already had an answer.  The site has helped me a few times in the past, maybe it will be useful to you too.

 
Pearl Sutton
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Orin Raichart wrote:
I saw your post and was going to use this site CalPhotos Plants to help identify your mystery plant...by the time I got around to it, you already had an answer.  The site has helped me a few times in the past, maybe it will be useful to you too.


Thank you :) I bookmarked it. Wouldn't have done much for this one, being as I had NO clue of a name or anything, but may be useful in the future :)
 
Pearl Sutton
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Went to a naturopath today who is also a master herbalist. Told her about this, she said "OH NEAT!!" and will pass it on to others in the area that I have a nice organic patch of it that I will be protecting.
Cool!
 
Orin Raichart
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Pearl Sutton wrote:.....NO clue of a name or anything, but may be useful in the future :)....



Dang! I forgot that I had to use multiple sites and that the CA Berkley Site was the one I could use to finalize the ID.

The trouble with plant ID sites is that it's hard to find one that starts with physical characteristics such as this site, WildFlower.org, under its combination search.

Here is a site which is a bit tricky to use but can also be useful:
NRCS.USDA.gov

probably should start here on that site though:
top link of nrcs

Here is someone who actively reviews sites for plant id:
identifythatplant

once I had a common or scientific name then I would go to CA Berkley to finalize the id....but hey, you could always just ask and get an answer with in a few moments if the right people respond :)
 
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