• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Mike Haasl
  • James Freyr
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Kate Downham
  • Jay Angler
  • thomas rubino

It's raining maple seeds....from squirrels! :)

 
garden master
Posts: 1256
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
479
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It's that time of the year again in my area that maple seeds begin maturing and start filling the sky as they take their helicopter decent down to their new earthy home, and sometimes a little prematurely, thanks to the squirrels!

It seems like it starts with one squirrel, feasting on the plethora of pink and red maple seeds, and realizing that the seeds are way too numerous to be enjoyed alone, invites all of their fellow furry friends to join in on the harvest and buffet.

Watching through the window, I can see them venture out on the furthest reaches of the limbs, munching away, and showering down maple seeds below them. If I venture outside and open the door, the squirrels quickly descend also, darting rapidly into the nearby woods.

Has it started raining maple seeds for anyone else this year?

 
gardener
Posts: 1726
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
578
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I haven't seen squirrels in my maple trees, but I know of people observing them locally throwing down fir cones and have been a victim myself! They have already been checking out the hazelnut tree this spring.
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 1256
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
479
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jay Angler wrote:I haven't seen squirrels in my maple trees, but I know of people observing them locally throwing down fir cones and have been a victim myself! They have already been checking out the hazelnut tree this spring.



Yeah, I've had them do that to me before too!
 
gardener
Posts: 966
Location: Ohio, USA
172
dog forest garden fish fungi trees urban food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I got pelted by acorns while collecting them. Most maple seeds are edible and delicious in salad (peel off the helicopter). So, I am waiting for the fun!
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 1256
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
479
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Amit Enventres wrote:I got pelted by acorns while collecting them.



Ouch!

Most maple seeds are edible and delicious in salad (peel off the helicopter). So, I am waiting for the fun!



Very cool Amit!
 
pollinator
Posts: 744
Location: Denmark 57N
164
fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Amit Enventres wrote:I got pelted by acorns while collecting them. Most maple seeds are edible and delicious in salad (peel off the helicopter). So, I am waiting for the fun!



I got really excited about this, but then I looked up the only maple we have around here Acer pseudoplatanus. (common name Sycamore) And drat not only is it not edible it can be poisonous and fatal to horses, the compound they contain is hypoglycin A which can also be fatal to humans. the levels depend on the tree and the weather, but not something I'm about to play around with :( even though it's not going to do much harm in small doses.
 
Amit Enventres
gardener
Posts: 966
Location: Ohio, USA
172
dog forest garden fish fungi trees urban food preservation solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Skandi Rogers wrote:
I got really excited about this, but then I looked up the only maple we have around here Acer pseudoplatanus. (common name Sycamore) And drat not only is it not edible it can be poisonous and fatal to horses, the compound they contain is hypoglycin A which can also be fatal to humans. the levels depend on the tree and the weather, but not something I'm about to play around with :( even though it's not going to do much harm in small doses.



Yikes! Yes, always better safe than sorry. Funny though, my initial research shows that it's edible to humans and poisonous to horses. However, please do what you feel is right. We have red maples and sugar maples here and have eaten many salads with crunchy maples seeds on top.
 
permaculture is a more symbiotic relationship with nature so I can be even lazier. Read tiny ad:
Switching from electric heat to a rocket mass heater reduces your carbon footprint as much as parking 7 cars
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!