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Claytonia as winter blanket for dwarf runner beans?

 
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I'm interested in creating a perennial system that can be scaled to large scale agriculture.

In the UK we have a dwarf runner  bean 'Hestia it grows to 50cm without support and can be perennial if protected from hard frost.

So I'm thinking of using https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claytonia_perfoliata as a winter 'blanket' to cover the soil.

It emerges in Oct/Nov and dies off in May.

I'd probably mow it just before the beans emerge.

Let the beans dry on the plant and harvest in September,  then mow down the plants.

Has anyone used Claytonia in a similar way?
 
pollinator
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I don't think it will die off in May in the UK, I suspect it dies back in May in it's home range due to the temperature getting too high and it getting too dry, here it certainly grows all summer long (we grow it to sell over summer) and my summers are comparable to the midlands. that is also alluded to in that wiki article. I also do not think that a thin layer of plant leaves is going to offer any frost protection, unless you are down in Cornwall or somewhere where it really is mild.
 
sam na
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I'm pretty sure ours was dead by June last year, it's seeding and yellowing at the moment. Running a mower over it around now would almost certainly finish it off I think.

I guess I was imagining the air pocket between the leaf canopy and the ground would act as the insulation.

I'm just North of Bristol so reasonably mild. I guess I'll try it on a small area to start.
 
gardener
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Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
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My Claytonia stayed pretty small until two month ago, maybe due to seeding around november. This year i'll save the seed again and plant earlier.
IMG_1167.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_1167.jpg]
 
sam na
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If you let it seed you'll get a dense carpet in the same location next year. Ours comes up around early October
 
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Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b) Rainfall 26"
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I've had claytonia on my allotment in Staffordshire.  For a year or maybe two it did seed itself, but it wasn't much of a trier.  I think the slugs liked it too much, and the seeds are very fine.  Corn salad, now, is a different matter, I sow it in autumn just chucking the seed all over the place and it stands all winter, and it seeds itself too.  About now it is coming up to flower so I can imagine something perennial would come through it quite nicely.  It just looks more blankety to me than claytonia, the foliage is denser and more complex than all those spindly little stems with leaves on the end.

That said, for sheer insulating power I'd be more inclined to trust in a layer of dead leaves or straw.
 
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We have a winter annual ground cover here called deadnettle; That is it looks like miniture nettles but has no stingers.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamiaceaelink
Self sows in disturbed soil this time of year and only grows during the winter.
Chick weed can form a denser mat but tends to grow mor in the spring so not as good at frost protection.
I have had runner beans come up from the overwintered roots when mulched with maple leaves.
 
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