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What happened? My tomatoes are dying, please help!

 
Posts: 39
Location: Turin, Italy
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I planted these two days ago, they were happpy and healthy when I planted them, and now the leaves are thinning in spots and turning white than brown. I started these from seeds and would be so dissappointed if they don't make it. Any suggestions how to save them?


Here's a link to the thread where i described how i planted them

https://permies.com/t/111564/tomato-experiment
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Posts: 19
Location: Northern Minnesota
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Did you acclimate them to being outside in the real sun first? It looks to me like sun damage on a tender plant. Since they're planted in the ground, I would provide some shade during the times when the sun is strongest. If it is sun damage, the plant will probably recover, but it will probably lose a lot of the really damaged leaves.

If it is acclimated to being outside, it's probably a pest or disease I'm not familiar with. I hope more people chime in!
 
Posts: 7118
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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I think it could be sun burn also, although it sounds as though your crates might have had very little soil and a lot of grass clippings and branches? I think that planting arrangement could cause problems later if not now.
 
pollinator
Posts: 758
Location: 6a
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Acclimation is a possibility.  They look overwatered or over fertilized.  I'd move the mulch away from the base of the trunk, remove the dead leaves from plants and stop watering for a bit.   Don't fertilize either.  Just my two cents.   It's always a guessing game.
 
pollinator
Posts: 615
Location: Denmark 57N
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another vote for sun/wind burn, give them shelter and they will pull through. no fertiliser until they have their first set of fruit on, too much nitrogen now will make big bushy plants with lots of leaves and not much fruit.
 
steward
Posts: 4776
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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They look fine to me. I'd leave them alone and let them try to grow.
 
gardener
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Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Since the new leaves look fine I agree with Joseph, leave them alone for a while so they can adjust to their new surroundings and get over the transplant shock, they will be fine.
 
Meyer Raymond
Posts: 39
Location: Turin, Italy
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I read a bit online and saw that i should have eased them outside, which i didn't, so sunburn sounds right.

I've never fertilized any of our plants, I've always just hoped for the miracle of nature (that so far has always pulled through😉),so i won't fertilize now for sure.

This is my first year trying to learn and improve yield, methods ecc.  I work full time, have rabbits, chickens and have two small kids so i don't have much time, i read not enough and experiment.. I'll probably fail a lot and ask uninformed questions and hope to get better and in the meantime am so grateful for your input and help!

Thanks to all permies!
 
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