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What are the consequences of plants flowering.

 
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I'm not sure what to do with My Rhubarb, Turkish Rocket, horseradish, and volunteer onions.  They are all flowering.   Parts of my forest are transitioning from new plantings to doing their own thing.  Should I be splitting this stuff up and replanting?  Can I eat onions that flower?  I've never dug or used the horseradish, what are the consequences for things like the taste?  I'm not sure what to do with all of this.  I know it's good for the bugs so I'm not too concerned but it's definitely a transition in the garden.  A cool one at that.



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Nothing, they are perennials and will flower each year, I remove the flowers from my Rhubarb as it's meant to help it produce more stalks. You will hear a lot of people saying Rhubarb flowers because something is wrong, like too hot or dry or shady or pretty much anything. But it is just programed to flower every year and so it will try no matter how happy it is, you don't hear people saying OH NO my roses are flowering I must have done something wrong.

So the flowers in the pictures, it will make no difference to your Rhubarb, horseradish or chives. Onions that flower will not make bulbs that keep and will die after the flower is done so pull them up and use them as you need them.
 
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The plants and onions aren't really going to increase in size anymore since all the plant energy is going to producing seeds for the next generation. This is fantastic if you want to save seeds and even develop a landrace variety adapted to your local microclimate. I've pulled and eaten many an onion that have gone to flower, they're still good!
 
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James Freyr wrote:The plants and onions aren't really going to increase in size anymore since all the plant energy is going to producing seeds for the next generation. This is fantastic if you want to save seeds and even develop a landrace variety adapted to your local microclimate. I've pulled and eaten many an onion that have gone to flower, they're still good!



Thanks, James This is a small hugel area near the drive-way and it's more for looks than anything else.  The deer eat whatever they want.  I really like your idea of collecting seeds.  Do you know anything about horseradish?  All I know is I love it on a big slab of Virginia Ham.
 
Scott Foster
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Skandi Rogers wrote:Nothing, they are perennials and will flower each year, I remove the flowers from my Rhubarb as it's meant to help it produce more stalks. You will hear a lot of people saying Rhubarb flowers because something is wrong, like too hot or dry or shady or pretty much anything. But it is just programed to flower every year and so it will try no matter how happy it is, you don't hear people saying OH NO my roses are flowering I must have done something wrong.

So the flowers in the pictures, it will make no difference to your Rhubarb, horseradish or chives. Onions that flower will not make bulbs that keep and will die after the flower is done so pull them up and use them as you need them.



...
So do you think I should split this stuff up and replant in other parts of the garden?  

Thanks
 
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Horseradish roots will continue to grow (year after year) until you dig them up to use them.
They will self seed if left alone and that will create a nice patch of plants so you always have good, fresh horseradish root to grate.
 
Scott Foster
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:Horseradish roots will continue to grow (year after year) until you dig them up to use them.
They will self seed if left alone and that will create a nice patch of plants so you always have good, fresh horseradish root to grate.



Thanks, Bryant that's good to know.  I'm always worried about using the bounty of plants too soon before they get established.  Looks like that area will be for the horseradish.
 
Skandi Rogers
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Scott Foster wrote:

Skandi Rogers wrote:Nothing, they are perennials and will flower each year, I remove the flowers from my Rhubarb as it's meant to help it produce more stalks. You will hear a lot of people saying Rhubarb flowers because something is wrong, like too hot or dry or shady or pretty much anything. But it is just programed to flower every year and so it will try no matter how happy it is, you don't hear people saying OH NO my roses are flowering I must have done something wrong.

So the flowers in the pictures, it will make no difference to your Rhubarb, horseradish or chives. Onions that flower will not make bulbs that keep and will die after the flower is done so pull them up and use them as you need them.



...
So do you think I should split this stuff up and replant in other parts of the garden?  

Thanks



you can split chives if you like, I split my rhubarbs every 3-4 years. No point splitting horseradish unless you really want more, in which case dig up a root cut it into couple of inch pieces and bury them where you want them.
 
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