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Is this a fruit tree? Pear or plum?

 
gardener
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I am working on cutting the grass etc before it turns into forest and I noticed these plants around my fruit trees. Are they baby fruit  trees?  The nearest deciduous tree is quite far away so I am hoping...
20190528_145442.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20190528_145442.jpg]
 
pollinator
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Looks like  plum to me!
 
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This looks like plum.  Here are some leaf pics
37769873-plum-leaf-isolated-with-shadow.jpg
[Thumbnail for 37769873-plum-leaf-isolated-with-shadow.jpg]
Plum Leaf
pear-leaf-26216420.jpg
[Thumbnail for pear-leaf-26216420.jpg]
Pear Leaf
37068879-green-apple-leaf.jpg
[Thumbnail for 37068879-green-apple-leaf.jpg]
Apple
 
Sonja Draven
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Thank you both!!  I didn't plan to add another of that tree but I am happy to change my plans. Especially if the pear trees continue to be unhappy there, I can create the space.

I think I will leave an uncut area around the babies and see which ones do best this year. Hopefully the deer will continue to miss them.
 
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And those appear to be suckers coming up from the roots of the adult tree, rather than seedlings.  So, if the original tree is on it's own rootstock, you will have clones.  I've been able to dig up cherry volunteers in my WV yard and introduce them on my KY ridgetop.  I already know they are resistant to invasion from tent caterpillars, which destroyed all the original fruit trees the seller had planted.
 
Sonja Draven
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Thanks Ruth. How can you tell they are suckers? Can I transplant mine too or does that mean doing so will damage the roots?
 
Ruth Meyers
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Sonja Draven wrote: How can you tell they are suckers? Can I transplant mine too or does that mean doing so will damage the roots?



Ooops, I had lost track of this conversation thread.

You will want to dig one up, and it will be very apparent whether it has it's own root system or is sprouting from the main tree. Seedling roots will be rudimentary.  Sucker roots are tough and heavy, and you will be cutting through the extended root to free the new tree.  But don't worry about damage.  Suckers are exhibiting the vigor of the entire plant.  You will notice additional local root development at this point, adequate to sustain the new tree.  Put it in water till you put it in the ground again.  Even holding them for several days this way, my success rate has been 50% by the next season, and the parent tree is sending up even more suckers.  I will soon have a full orchard in both locations.  The birds will be ecstatic!
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