• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Ash Jackson
  • Kate Downham

Corona virus (covid-19) prepping

 
pollinator
Posts: 379
Location: Athens, GA Zone 8a
73
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Speaking of dog food, I ordered the super-essential dog Milkbone biscuits and Dreambones. Our dogs will eat beans and rice along with us as long as they get their damned biscuits! If we run out of biscuits, live will not be worth living anymore, because we will be harrassed to death, especially by our chiweenie Bingo, who would hunger-strike for Milkbones. Go figure.

I ordered plenty of chicken feed, which I keep inside until needed. We only have two chickens, but the eggs are getting ahead of me, so I'm freezing four of them to a ziplock, scrambled up a bit with a little salt, for pulling out as needed. I'm pulling the wealth of chickweed in the yard plus the invasive water celery to feed to the chickens.

I ordered a ton of teas, both bagged and loose, because it's going to be a while before I can get teas out of the garden. (Just started getting into tea this year so have been researching what's in our yard already that tea can be made of Yaupon holly for caffeine if needed!) Stash sells their teas in bulk for a reasonable price on Amazon, all individually wrapped, so I got a box of Lemon Ginger. Also stinging nettle, loose, which is good for tea but can also be put into soups.

I froze a few gallons of milk, several large bags of mozarella cheese, a 15 lb. bag of rice, and I have lots of canned and dried beans. I tried this recipe in my instant pot, and it was really easy.  
 Louise is working on recipes to help those of us who aren't great cooks but are having to deal with cooking from cheap pantry stocks.

Hoping to get fresh stuff from the garden for salads before too much longer.


 
pollinator
Posts: 339
Location: Southern Germany
159
kids books urban chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts bee
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Diane Kistner wrote:

Where do we go now? I mean, really...


OT: Aw Diane, thanks so much for this link!
My favourite version is probably still the one from Captain Fantastic (with Viggo Mortensen) but this is very cool as well. It's a bit embarrassing that I have not come across this band earlier. There is something new to learn every day...
 
Posts: 129
Location: Washington DC area (zone 7a)
19
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Joshua Bertram wrote:

Trace Oswald wrote:

Joshua Bertram wrote:I also bought a comfrey plant (for t.p.....not that I'm really that worried, butT you never know.



Lol, you're going to regret it if you try that.  Comfrey is really picky.  Some people can't even touch it without gloves.  You may as well use a cactus.



Oh, lol, I thought I read about people using it.  After having done a search, it looks like maybe that's a bad idea.

I'll use it for chop and drop, and not so much chop and plop.  haha

Thanks!



reminds me of my first experience with Poison Ivy when I was *maybe* 4 years old and needing to go to the bathroom in the woods.  50+ years later I still remember being bed ridden, but thank the Great WIRT (Whatever Is Running Things) that I do not remember the pain...
 
pollinator
Posts: 469
Location: zone 4b, sandy, Continental D
128
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here in Central Wisconsin, it is pretty much the same thing, unfortunately: Folks buying pizza, trying to stock up on toilet paper. I scored one pack yesterday a Fleet Farm. They said limit 2 to a customer, but I only have one A..hole, so why buy 2? [ha,ha]
About comfrey: It is a great plant to have around. Some folks are reporting skin irritation. Yes, they are a tad prickly, but not if you use gloves or if you allow it to wilt a bit. Even though they tell you your liver is going to die if you make tea from it, I dry some of my crop to use for tea.
Like everything in life, MODERATION is the key. It is also called "boneset" because of its ability to mend broken bones [in an external poultice application]. I use it mostly as chop and drop, and also as chicken feed because the plant is so prolific. Not sure it would help at all for Covid 19 though.
 
pollinator
Posts: 2085
Location: 4b
498
dog forest garden trees bee building
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Cécile Stelzer Johnson wrote:
About comfrey: It is a great plant to have around.



It's a great plant.  It just isn't a great plant to wipe your ass with.
 
pollinator
Posts: 157
Location: Providence, RI, USA
77
forest garden trees urban
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Diane Kistner wrote:
Hoping to get fresh stuff from the garden for salads before too much longer.



Hi Diane,

Sprouting is helping us to supplement the small amount of greens that we can get delivered. Here is a video that I made about sprouting lentils. I have over 50 garden and kitchen videos on Instagram (@foodforestcardgame) but I put this one up on YouTube so people in this forum could find it through this post:



Stay well!
Karl

P.S. Please consider subscribing to my YouTube and following me on IG (@foodforestcardgame)
 
Posts: 60
Location: The Great PNW
16
purity fungi foraging chicken medical herbs homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Posting a pic of this amazing solar powered hand crank radio flashlight that i got years ago on Amazon.
Reason im recommending this specific radio to everyone it: My dad has had this exact model in his living room for years, at least 6+. He left it alone for about 2 years, just sitting in the window, catching the little sun that comes through (were in the PNW, not much sun at most times) and he hadnt charged the thing in YEARS (it DOES have a plug in charging capability). He just picks it up during a family get together and goes "huh, hanvent touched this thing is years, lets see if it works". Turns the thing on and we listen to the radio for quite a long time. So, of course, im pretty impressed that that little top panel worked to power the thing that well, and i ordered one the next day :)
Hand crank works well to charge, too. Ive tested that function out before. And the addition of the flashlight function gives you an added bonus ;)
Hope y'all enjoy!

cheers!

M
solar-powered-hand-crank-radio-flashlight.jpg
[Thumbnail for solar-powered-hand-crank-radio-flashlight.jpg]
 
This guy is skipping without a rope. At least, that's what this tiny ad said:
the permaculture bootcamp in winter
https://permies.com/t/149839/permaculture-projects/permaculture-bootcamp-winter
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic