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Propagating Blood (cling) Peaches

 
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Interesting how there’s much more of the white peach colouring in your blood peach.
 
Megan Palmer
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A wind storm damaged a couple of branches on my free stone blood peach tree and thinned the fruit at the same time! Hoping that the remaining peaches will be ready to eat in a few weeks time. Have any of your pits germinated Judith?
20200303_170925.jpg
Free stone peach tree
Free stone peach tree
 
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Have any of your pits germinated Judith?



I just checked yesterday and nothing yet.  
I wouldn't expect them to sprout for another month at least though as it needs to warm up a bit.  I'll probably be tempted to pop one out of the soil and give it a look sometime soon.  So happy to have them and really appreciate your perseverance getting them here

Your tree looks great and the view even better!  Is that a lake right out your door?


 
Judith Browning
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Now, I have some of my pits from last year germinating...nothing from yours yet Megan but I have hope.  I wonder how they will adjust to being out of sync with our seasons? might take a longer time to sprout?  I will probably pop one out of the pot and check in a few days just out of curiosity  
 
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Hi Judith,

Do you have any Indian Blood pits you might be willing to share? Id be glad to purchase them.
thanks

Will
wil05us
yahoo
 
Judith Browning
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Megan...here it is!

I'm really excited to have even one germinate...
It will have a place of honor here


I see my label says July 2020 which must have been when I planted the kernel?  
The pot stayed outdoors ever since with a little straw on top over the winter and survived our super cold and snowy February.

IMG_8750-(2).JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_8750-(2).JPG]
IMG_8751-(2).JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_8751-(2).JPG]
 
Judith Browning
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Will Williams wrote:Hi Judith,

Do you have any Indian Blood pits you might be willing to share? Id be glad to purchase them.
thanks

Will
wil05us
yahoo



Hi, Will....I won't know for awhile? There are just a few peaches that made it through our late freezes and now there is a serious frost expected in a week...so might lose even those.  
Sorry I missed your post until now...even last year I only had a small crop due to late freezes and frosts.

I'll definitely post here if I have some to share.
 
Megan Palmer
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Hello Judith, so glad that you have at least one seedling for your efforts. Thank you so much for the photos, it looks really healthy. The blossoms on my tree at home were damaged by a frost and only one branch closest to the house bore any fruit, just enough to make a small batch of jam that will be savoured!
 
Megan Palmer
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How is your BBP seedling doing Judith?

With any luck, it ought to bear fruit within another three years.

Back in 2011 I posted some BBP pits to a gardener on Lasqueti Island, British Columbia and of 7 pits, the only only one that germinated fruited after 3 years and from that tree, he grew another 5 trees. Last year, he shared 30 pits with his friend at TreeEater Nursery so if there's anyone in BC wanting to grow a BBP, you know where you can buy some.

My tree at home has had a heavy pruning this year, the branches were getting too tall for me to reach all the fruit so not expecting much of a harvest this year.

The white fleshed peach planted at the community garden is loaded with blossoms and if they make it through our late spring frosts and winds, am hopeful of a good crop this year. It was planted from a pit in 2015, went into the ground in 2016 and first fruited in 2019.

Two pit grown apricots are also in blossom but they have yet to bear fruit - they get hammered by the winds and frost every year.

Planted several more peaches and apricots last autumn in a more sheltered position - four golden queens, a NZ clingstone peach that is great for eating and preserving and a couple more black boy peaches.

20210901_114820-1-.jpg
Pruned black boy peach
Pruned black boy peach
20190902_082118-1-.jpg
White fleshed peach blossoming for the first time at four years old
White fleshed peach blossoming for the first time at four years old
20210228_115042-1-.jpg
this year's fruit
this year's fruit
20210303_211506-1-.jpg
white fleshed peach
white fleshed peach
20210903_161123-1-.jpg
Two pit grown apricots
Two pit grown apricots
20210903_161239-1-.jpg
Apricot blossoms
Apricot blossoms
 
Judith Browning
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Hi Megan!

I'm not on line much anymore so slow to reply.....

The peach sprouted from your pits is doing great...at least 12 inches tall and will go in the ground when the rains begin again.

The newer pits are divided between some pots outdoors and a soil mix in a bag in the refrigerator.

Fingers crossed

Your trees and fruit look wonderful!!!
 
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Hello Judith and everyone!

I’ve red your old post on blood peaches and the topic on propagating them from stones and I would like very much to try this myself. I have tried finding indian blood peach trees (freestone or clingstone) seedlings or grafted but I live in Europe and didn’t have much luck.
I know that sending stones overseas is a little more complicated than sending them inland but I would very much like to ask you, if you will have peaches this next season, to send me some stones and I will, of course, support all the costs involved. I really wish to have them in my small orchard (I live in a 7b climate) and is very frustrating not being able to find these varieties anywhere.
Wishing you all all the best, and a wonderful next next season!
Best wishes,
Ioana from Romania
 
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Ioana Hotea wrote:
Hello Judith and everyone!

I’ve red your old post on blood peaches and the topic on propagating them from stones and I would like very much to try this myself. I have tried finding indian blood peach trees (freestone or clingstone) seedlings or grafted but I live in Europe and didn’t have much luck.
I know that sending stones overseas is a little more complicated than sending them inland but I would very much like to ask you, if you will have peaches this next season, to send me some stones and I will, of course, support all the costs involved. I really wish to have them in my small orchard (I live in a 7b climate) and is very frustrating not being able to find these varieties anywhere.
Wishing you all all the best, and a wonderful next next season!
Best wishes,
Ioana from Romania


I know it's not allowed legally in many places but when you send seeds by envelope they usually arrive intact in most places, customs don't have time to go through all envelopes to see if there is something mildly illegal like seeds in them. If you are worried about pests coming with the seeds you can sterilize the seeds with hydrogen peroxide, bleach, white vinegar etc. And in the case of peaches the actual seed is on the inside of the pit, so it's extra safe from any pests.
 
Anton Jacobski Hedman
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Judith Browning wrote:No peaches this year...too many freezes after the bloom.  
I'll update this thread when I have some...

In the meantime if anyone wants to guide me through taking scions I would be happy to learn so I could share them rather than depending on fruit set.  I know it's late for this year but maybe I could take some cuttings when I prune next winter?


You can definitely grow peaches from cuttings, I am in fact surprised that people haven't been asking for scions/cuttings here so much. It's a good way to preserve a tree's unique genetics and take them with you to a new place, the roots of a tree grown from cuttings might not be as strong as that of a seeded tree but almost all trees bought in nurseries are already grown on cloned rootstock cuttings anyway. As long as you use sterile soil/medium, damp but not too wet soil/medium, not too compact of a medium, rooting hormone, enough light and warmth and put a plastic bag on top AND keep fungus gnats away(fungus gnat larvae destroy cuttings) they have a very high chance of rooting them successfully. With peaches I've found that they especially need to be rooted with hardwood cuttings as the softwood ones rot way too easily, so late fall/winter is a good time to take those I guess.
 
Ioana Hotea
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I know it's not allowed legally in many places but when you send seeds by envelope they usually arrive intact in most places, customs don't have time to go through all envelopes to see if there is something mildly illegal like seeds in them. If you are worried about pests coming with the seeds you can sterilize the seeds with hydrogen peroxide, bleach, white vinegar etc. And in the case of peaches the actual seed is on the inside of the pit, so it's extra safe from any pests.

I happened to get some lily bulbs form US and other seeds with no problems. But unfortunately it is prohibited to import bare roots fruit trees from nurseries from US to EU under normal conditions and the nurseries that carry heirloom varieties such Indian Blood are rare and and are not authorized for export.
This is why I hope very much  that, if conditions are suitable, you could send me some kernels to propagate myself. I hope to get at least one viable seedling and to further propagate it here so it would become a variety available in EU also. I grew up in the countryside and had a wonderful fruit forest at my late grandparents, and now I have my own little orchard with 20+ fruit trees that I love to care for. It is such a joy to see them grow, flower and ripen their fruits. I hope to soon add this wonderful variety to my garden and in time to share it with friends and family. It’s such a pity that delicious and healthy heirlooms like this are so rare and virtually unknown to most.
All the best,
Ioana
 
Anton Jacobski Hedman
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Ioana Hotea wrote:
I happened to get some lily bulbs form US and other seeds with no problems. But unfortunately it is prohibited to import bare roots fruit trees from nurseries from US to EU under normal conditions and the nurseries that carry heirloom varieties such Indian Blood are rare and and are not authorized for export.
This is why I hope very much  that, if conditions are suitable, you could send me some kernels to propagate myself. I hope to get at least one viable seedling and to further propagate it here so it would become a variety available in EU also. I grew up in the countryside and had a wonderful fruit forest at my late grandparents, and now I have my own little orchard with 20+ fruit trees that I love to care for. It is such a joy to see them grow, flower and ripen their fruits. I hope to soon add this wonderful variety to my garden and in time to share it with friends and family. It’s such a pity that delicious and healthy heirlooms like this are so rare and virtually unknown to most.
All the best,
Ioana



I also live in Europe and would love to try growing these as well, though my climate is near the northernmost possible range of peaches already. Still trees grown from Italian/Spanish grocery store peaches/nectarines grow well enough here. I am pretty sure these blood peaches are a bit more hardy than the Mediterranean varieties? Unless their origin is from the US deep south. It's sad that we have lost so much of the genetic diversity of peaches that the Native Americans had, many of their varieties were probably quite cold hardy and better adapted to more humid and temperate climates.

Btw there are also European red peach varieties that are easier to get ahold of. In France in some areas they grow blood peaches in between grape vines, they call them "Peche Sanguine" and "Peche de Vigne".

Example of a place selling Peche Sanguine: https://www.meillandrichardier.com/pecher-sanguine-vineuse.html

You can probably find a nursery in France willing to send you one of these trees. Even some of those that don't list your country but list others like Germany, Portugal etc can probably send you the tree if you order via email. I mean you are within the EU right?

Edit: Of course these would still not taste the same as Indian Blood Peaches as they are of a different stock/origin that both happened to be selected for more attractive red flesh fruits.
 
Ioana Hotea
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Anton Jacobski Hedman wrote:

I also live in Europe and would love to try growing these as well, though my climate is near the northernmost possible range of peaches already. Still trees grown from Italian/Spanish grocery store peaches/nectarines grow well enough here. I am pretty sure these blood peaches are a bit more hardy than the Mediterranean varieties? Unless their origin is from the US deep south. It's sad that we have lost so much of the genetic diversity of peaches that the Native Americans had, many of their varieties were probably quite cold hardy and better adapted to more humid and temperate climates.

Btw there are also European red peach varieties that are easier to get ahold of. In France in some areas they grow blood peaches in between grape vines, they call them "Peche Sanguine" and "Peche de Vigne".

Example of a place selling Peche Sanguine: https://www.meillandrichardier.com/pecher-sanguine-vineuse.html

You can probably find a nursery in France willing to send you one of these trees. Even some of those that don't list your country but list others like Germany, Portugal etc can probably send you the tree if you order via email. I mean you are within the EU right?

Edit: Of course these would still not taste the same as Indian Blood Peaches as they are of a different stock/origin that both happened to be selected for more attractive red flesh fruits.



Yes, I know about the European varieties, peches sanguine, and also intend to buy a Sanguine de Savoie peach tree, there are nurseries that deliver in all EU countries. It would be interesting to compare the French blood peaches to the American ones. From what information I have come upon, in France these peaches date back to the 18th century, so the US varieties are a little bit older. But there is not much information available on the subject of parentage, if the varieties are related to each other. In the 1700s France the probability of either original Chinese peaches or the American Indian Blood peach to arrive and to be planted is quite equal. From what I know from history, the French were avid collectors of exotic plants and liked also the experiment (the modern strawberry for example was born in France).
Anyway, I will try the Sanguine de Savoie peach this spring, I hope to get a potted young tree that will fruit soon and I will post here for sure my impressions on the fruit, but in an year or so..
Best wishes,
Ioana
 
Anton Jacobski Hedman
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Ioana Hotea wrote:

Anton Jacobski Hedman wrote:

I also live in Europe and would love to try growing these as well, though my climate is near the northernmost possible range of peaches already. Still trees grown from Italian/Spanish grocery store peaches/nectarines grow well enough here. I am pretty sure these blood peaches are a bit more hardy than the Mediterranean varieties? Unless their origin is from the US deep south. It's sad that we have lost so much of the genetic diversity of peaches that the Native Americans had, many of their varieties were probably quite cold hardy and better adapted to more humid and temperate climates.

Btw there are also European red peach varieties that are easier to get ahold of. In France in some areas they grow blood peaches in between grape vines, they call them "Peche Sanguine" and "Peche de Vigne".

Example of a place selling Peche Sanguine: https://www.meillandrichardier.com/pecher-sanguine-vineuse.html

You can probably find a nursery in France willing to send you one of these trees. Even some of those that don't list your country but list others like Germany, Portugal etc can probably send you the tree if you order via email. I mean you are within the EU right?

Edit: Of course these would still not taste the same as Indian Blood Peaches as they are of a different stock/origin that both happened to be selected for more attractive red flesh fruits.



Yes, I know about the European varieties, peches sanguine, and also intend to buy a Sanguine de Savoie peach tree, there are nurseries that deliver in all EU countries. It would be interesting to compare the French blood peaches to the American ones. From what information I have come upon, in France these peaches date back to the 18th century, so the US varieties are a little bit older. But there is not much information available on the subject of parentage, if the varieties are related to each other. In the 1700s France the probability of either original Chinese peaches or the American Indian Blood peach to arrive and to be planted is quite equal. From what I know from history, the French were avid collectors of exotic plants and liked also the experiment (the modern strawberry for example was born in France).
Anyway, I will try the Sanguine de Savoie peach this spring, I hope to get a potted young tree that will fruit soon and I will post here for sure my impressions on the fruit, but in an year or so..
Best wishes,
Ioana


Oh ok, I see.

And yeah I also thought that it wouldn't be impossible for the French blood peaches to originate from seeds from Indian/American blood peaches. Would be fun to hear your impressions about it for sure. Btw I am pretty sure that importing uncertified seeds into the EU is technically illegal, so sending seeds by mail from say the US would be illegal, technically. Of course nobody really gets punished for anything like that, and on top of that most seeds will arrive intact anyway.
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