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Help with diseased apple tree

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Hi - I have a few apple trees that are suffering from something, but I can't tell if its Fire Blight or Cedar Apple Rust, or something else?   Any help would be welcome!
Screenshot_10_7_19__8_11_PM.jpg
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pollinator
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I would guess Cedar Apple Rust. Not sure though. Probably someone on here will be able to tell for sure.  It could have more than one disease. My trees with CAR didn’t have the large black areas.  It looks like a small tree. Is it still in a pot? I would seriously consider not planting it unless you have another area with no cedars. What variety is it? Some varieties are much more resistant than others.

I’m going to do some grafting on mine and change the variety of some of the branches.
 
ScottLatchkey Campbell
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Thanks, Ken!  I believe its a Honey Crisp.  It is small, but not in a pot....its been in the ground for 2 years now, planted as bare root.
 
garden master
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If you have pictures of the area around the base of the tree and a full tree shot Scott, that can be really helpful.

Good drainage and healthy soil with lots of organic matter can help the tree better fight off diseases. Like Ken mentioned, some apple varieties seem to be susceptible to certain diseases, even in the most ideal situation.

I'm not sure where your location is, but my Honeycrisp struggles here in our warmer climate, as it seems to prefer colder climates.
 
ScottLatchkey Campbell
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Thanks, Steve.  I'll take some more pics this weekend.  We live in the Willamette Valley of Oregon - Dundee to be specific.  A very damp/humid summer which may have contributed to it?
 
gardener
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From this one photo that is fire blight, fire blight tends to only affect the leaves not the stems like CAR. Car will infect the branch as well as the leaves.

Honey Crisp trees are actually meant for zones 4-6, they have a requirement of more cold days than most apples and they don't do well from zone 7 thru 10.

I'd try to get some really good compost to make an aerated tea with then spray the whole tree and the soil around the roots.
After that first treatment try to use a compost tea to water the tree two weeks after the spraying.

Redhawk
 
ScottLatchkey Campbell
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OK - here's a full picture.  Thanks for all the advice!
Screenshot_10_13_19__9_35_AM.jpg
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Steve Thorn
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Great photo Scott!

I can't tell for sure based on the photo, but it looks like your soil is pretty rich in organic matter (circled in the bottom left) which is great!

I would guess the problem may be from not enough drainage. It looks like the water may be coming down the hill from the top right and creating a wet spot near your tree.

Maybe a small drainage ditch could be dug so the water could be diverted away from the tree, if it is in a wet spot, avoiding getting too close to the tree roots.

I've created some mounds around my fruit trees in wet places that have really helped their health and growth. Here's a link to that thread.

Building a Fruit Tree Mound to Create Own Root Fruit Trees and Increase Soil Drainage in a Wet Area

Hope this guess based on the photo was helpful!
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