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Rethinking the lingo?

 
Posts: 65
Location: Poland
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I usually talk about permaculture in Polish, but we often still use English words, even if there are translations available. Would it be possible to name some ideas, which are now embraced by permaculture, in other languages, according to their roots? For example, the "three sisters" planting system was invented by Native Americans, as far as I know... they must have a word for that? There is already a German word used - hugelkultur - but other than that, everything is in English (or translated to whichever language people speak).

What other concepts could be named in different languages? Or maybe already are?
 
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Location: the mountains of western nc
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tribes throughout north america (and probably central as well, since all three crops were mesoamerican in origin) were known for 'three sisters' type plantings. there are so many languages and language groups throughout this area that i don't know how you'd pick which one gets to be the one you'd use...
 
Flora Eerschay
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Why not know them all? At least in a book!
 
master pollinator
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Certain small rock structures used to control water are known as "media luna," Spanish for "half moon".  https://www.milkwood.net/2012/04/24/watershed-restoration-constructing-a-media-luna/
 
pollinator
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Hi Flora. Welcome.

There are a variety of words in use in an international permacultural context. Hugelkultur, as you mentioned, is a great example of this. I don't know what else you'd call it now that wouldn't come off as clumsy. Buried wood beds are the closest I have come, but that has been more for cases where the focus is the buried woody biomass and not the raised mound, adapting to frequently dry regions.

I don't know that thinking is at all necessary, and pardon if that sounds flip. What I mean to say is that language is most comfortable when arrived at organically. If we try to apply reason to it, we get things like Esperanto, a lovely concept and artificial language, both, but functionally less-useful in the modern day than Klingon.

But generating a full list of all the separate tools in the permacultural toolbox for linguistic regionalisation (a region-specific linguistic adaptation similar to anglicisation, but without the english focus) might be very useful. Communication is only effective when each can properly understand what the other means by use of specific words, but there isn't a reason not to have a collectively agreed-upon local key for pronunciation or translation/transliteration. Such probably already exists, as you mentioned, just happening when you take words from another language and use them in your linguistic context.

I firmly believe the best way for such to evolve is organically, gleaned from naturally-adopted usage.

But let us know how it goes, and good luck.

-CK
 
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