Win a copy of Building Community this week in the City Repair forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • paul wheaton
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Joylynn Hardesty
stewards:
  • r ranson
  • James Freyr
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Ash Jackson
  • thomas rubino
  • Carla Burke

Best tree to plant to diffuse 5G signals

 
Posts: 24
Location: Ithaca NY
4
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There is huge cell tower near our kid's school in the NE US that will likely have 5G transmitters soon. I have heard that tees interfere with 5G signals. I am able and have permission to plant trees on school property. So the question is, what tree or guild of trees will interfere the most, also interfere year round, also be fairly fast growing, also be very hardy, and also produce food and or other ecosystem advantages? Any ideas?
 
pollinator
Posts: 342
Location: East tn
85
hugelkultur foraging homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

carl gibson wrote:There is huge cell tower near our kid's school in the NE US that will likely have 5G transmitters soon. I have heard that tees interfere with 5G signals. I am able and have permission to plant trees on school property. So the question is, what tree or guild of trees will interfere the most, also interfere year round, also be fairly fast growing, also be very hardy, and also produce food and or other ecosystem advantages? Any ideas?



Check out lessemf for copper undershirts.
They also carry portable scanners so you can test trees in your area.

What I found is top of hill - strong signal.

Bottom of hill - weak signal.
 
gardener & hugelmaster
Posts: 1778
Location: mountains of Tennessee
679
cattle hugelkultur cat dog trees hunting chicken bee homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A Faraday Cage tree?
 
carl gibson
Posts: 24
Location: Ithaca NY
4
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I  am thinking evergreens because the needles are on year round. And I think a tree with needles will do more to diffuse 5G than a tree with bare branches. Also thinking Korean pine nut because it produces food and grows tall.
 
Posts: 154
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Some needle trees burn more easily than broad leaf if there is a huge fire. Eukalyptus is extremely bad. Check what happened in Portugal.

 
pollinator
Posts: 3531
Location: Toronto, Ontario
466
hugelkultur dog forest garden fungi trees rabbit urban wofati cooking bee homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have seen copper garments, and copper tension braces and bandages, and these are all usually promoted as improving circulation and decreasing chronic neuropathic pain. I don't know that I have seen copper headgear, though, which is, I think, what you'd want most, no?

I am not making a subtle tin-foil hat joke, though it occurs to me it could be taken that way. Seriously, wouldn't it be an option to have hats, for sun protection or for the cold, woven with copper filament like the pain and circulation garments, but acting as a faraday cage to protect the most sensitive electromagnetic component of the body?

That also accounts for the fact that those signals will be stronger at head-height than they will be at ankle-level.

But as to trees, I like the Korean Pine idea. I wish there was a local variety that would produce well enough to use, because I find working locals into the existing ecology much easier, but their usefulness as a food crop is obvious.

Slightly north of where I am, for instance, we might look at red pine for poor soil conditions, white where applicable, and jack pine for the understory, for starters. Raspberries and blueberries tend to pop up as pioneers any time a tree drops or a clearing is made, and my favourite culinary mushroom, the chanterelle, has a variety that likes to grow in the root zone of the jack pine. I think that you could still plant up a significant food forest guild even if the conifer dominating it all didn't produce human food directly.

I really like the suggestion J Davis made about using a portable scanner and testing trees around you to get information about how well they do what you're looking for.

One thing I wonder, though, is about the nature of the disturbance being caused to diffuse the signals. If it's just the physical tree getting in the way of the signal, that's one thing, and just choosing species that keep their needles or leaves year-round will do.

I wonder, though, if the signal disturbance has to do with trees as electromagnetic phenomena, as living things? If that is the case, might the blocking effect decrease in the winter, when the trees go dormant?

-CK
 
carl gibson
Posts: 24
Location: Ithaca NY
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I love the idea of kid's sun hats with copper fibers woven in. But kids are forever losing their hats, and that would get expensive fast. Plus, if the other parents didn't already think I was a little off, they would definitely rest their case if I started handing out faraday hats to their kids. You guys are absolutely right about the only way being to use a meter to measure signal strength under different trees at different times of year. I read that Korean  Pine growers to 100' plus so that is great for this application.

As far as wildfire vulnerability, in this area of the North East wildfire is not an issue at this time, but it definitely makes sense to prepare for it becoming an issue.
 
pollinator
Posts: 2897
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
265
forest garden solar
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Any tree that folks like, that install christmas/holyday lighting aka copper wire. And once christmas is over just leave them up but turned off. Maybe get the wires in a tree toned color.
 
pollinator
Posts: 616
Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
240
forest garden fish fungi trees food preservation cooking solar wood heat woodworking homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In Europe they're cutting like crazy, rumors have it it's because they block the 5G signal. 5G, they are going to have transmitters every 60 feet in cities because they need direct contact. I believe the walls of the schools might block it. The kids will probably complain and demand 5G in the school, parents will be outraged and sue the school for wanting 5G in the school. If i would have had a say i wouldn't have had my daughter in the public school system anyway, they learn nothing there , look at this world.
 
Posts: 378
Location: SW PA USA zone 6a altitude 1188ft
7
trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Before you spend a lot of money and time do some testing:
Find a metal building that you can get into. Check your bars outside and then go into the building and recheck your bars. I'm guessing you won't see much, if any, difference. Check your bars near a wood lot and then get between it and your tower. If you're in the middle of the wood lot it won't make much of a difference where the tower is. A lot of the large garage and inexpensive manufacturing facilities are built of metal. The old military quonset huts were fairly thick galvanized steel and didn't do much at blocking radio signals.
An RG8 coaxial cable used to connect a radio transmitter to an antenna looses 3db every 100 foot of cable. This means that it looses half the power every 100 feet. To imagine what this does in air look at a 70 watt light bulb at a distance. At a mile you won't get much light other than looking directly at the light. A cell tower transmits 75 watts of power at the antenna. At 100 feet half that power is lost in a coax cable much much more thru air.
If you want to pursue this further even after you see the results of your tests, I'd suggest you check with www.treeshrubseeds.com and just plant a lot of seeds of a fast growing evergreen tree.
 
I carry this gun in case a vending machine doesn't give me my fritos. This gun and this tiny ad:
100th Issue of Permaculture Magazine - now FREE for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/45/pmag
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic