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New Article on the History of Chayote (Mirlitons) In North America

 
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Here is the first article to be published on the history of Chayote (known as Mirlitons in The South) in North America.  You can grow them many places in the U.S. if you pick the right variety.  The article explains why varietal choice is important. We also provide methods for encouraging early flowering and frost protection of the faq page of our nonprofit web site, www.mirliton.org. The link to the article is:
https://www.mirliton.org/the-history-of-chayote-mirliton-in-north-america/
 
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Location: Central Texas zone 8a
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This is my first year attempting to grow chayote. It was recommemded by a member here.  Another case of "i never knew thst existed " which Permies forum has been great for.

I bought 3 at a local store. I ate one. It seems very versatile. I planted one in a pot to hopefully transplant. I put another in a paper bag to plant when it "sprouts". I hope one of these two succeeds.
 
Lance Hill
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wayne fajkus wrote:This is my first year attempting to grow chayote. It was recommemded by a member here.  Another case of "i never knew thst existed " which Permies forum has been great for.

I bought 3 at a local store. I ate one. It seems very versatile. I planted one in a pot to hopefully transplant. I put another in a paper bag to plant when it "sprouts". I hope one of these two succeeds.



If you bought them at a grocery store the probably won't grow in Texas.  Look at out garden blog for a Texas grower in Houston at www.mirliton.0rg
 
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Location: Kapoho, Hawaii, 500' elev.
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Chayote is grown widely in Hawai’i, it is even found growing wild. It must have been brought by the Portuguese, because the Hawai’i name is pipinola, which when I looked it up I found out is a translation of the Portuguese pepiniero, their name for chayote.
It is mostly used in soups here because it takes on whatever flavors are in the soup. Also the vine tendrils are stir fried. I’m just learning about the tubers and I think they have a lot of possibilities, most people don’t know about them. I bet the wild ones get huge tubers when they’ve been growing for years.
 
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Wayne (and others new to mirliton), there is some good info in a thread from last year. https://permies.com/t/102154/Mirliton-squash-vines-Louisiana

People who may be interested in small animal fodder: I can personally vouch for the vines and foliage being delectable for my rabbits and I've also seen goats and cows chomp them happily. I keep two growing in my garden (here they are chayote) specifically for this purpose.
 
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I would love to grow chayote. I first experienced it when i lived in Nepal for 8 months. The plant was very versatile and could produce new fruits every year. The fruits would start to sprout on their own and it seemed awesome because you could eat the root and the fruit. I also believe you could eat the new leaves.

Does anyone have a source for some seed in Canada?
 
Lance Hill
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"I would love to grow chayote. I first experienced it when i lived in Nepal for 8 months. The plant was very versatile and could produce new fruits every year. The fruits would start to sprout on their own and it seemed awesome because you could eat the root and the fruit. I also believe you could eat the new leaves.

Does anyone have a source for some seed in Canada?

Yes, people eat the leafs and tendrils as greens in many countries.  And the subterranean root (chayotera) which begins to grow after one years is cooked like a potato. It cannot be grown that far north.
https://www.mirliton.org/photo/various-mirlitons-and-tubers-chayotera-metairie-uptown-new-orleans-and-mirliton-tuber-chayote/

quote context: http://pllqt.it/3WGJA5
 
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