• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • paul wheaton
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Joylynn Hardesty
stewards:
  • r ranson
  • James Freyr
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Ash Jackson
  • thomas rubino
  • Carla Burke

Plant ID?

 
Posts: 30
Location: Georgia, USA, 7b
1
kids hunting urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What is this? Wild strawberry, or wishful thinking? Something seems off about both the flowers and the vine compared to other strawberries.
20200409_184101.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20200409_184101.jpg]
 
pollinator
Posts: 342
Location: East tn
85
hugelkultur foraging homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

adam johnson wrote:What is this? Wild strawberry, or wishful thinking? Something seems off about both the flowers and the vine compared to other strawberries.



Wishful thinking I'm afraid.
 
gardener
Posts: 2727
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1004
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Has it got prickles on the stem? The leaves look similar to some of the wild raspberry/blackberry family plants.
 
pollinator
Posts: 124
Location: Fryslân, Netherlands
50
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I agree with Jay Angler. Possibly something like this: http://www.foragingpictures.com/plants/Blackberry/h0010.htm.
 
adam johnson
Posts: 30
Location: Georgia, USA, 7b
1
kids hunting urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

J Grouwstra wrote:I agree with Jay Angler. Possibly something like this: http://www.foragingpictures.com/plants/Blackberry/h0010.htm.



Aha, yes, that would explain it. There are a few there in that patch, and they have sort of a creeping, low to the ground appearance that threw me off. I have actually never seen a raspberry/blackberry blossom before, but that is definitely what they are, i remember seeing the hairs on the stems now. thanks a lot for both the ID, and the new website to check out.
 
Jay Angler
gardener
Posts: 2727
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1004
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
How yummy the blackberries are can differ a lot from plant to plant, but they need to be quite black before they're ripe, so you'll have heavy competition from the birds!  Their low to the ground habit can make them a tripping hazard in places, so I'm known to pull them out if they're near paths we use a lot, but they're in no way endangered where we are and I leave lots of them alone, so it's just one of those compromises we all make to share the land.

We do have some of the little wild strawberries also. Yummm! They're so delicate though, the only way I've found to use them is pick straight to the mouth (or as Hubby says, "straight to the internal holding tank.) I suspect it'a a bit early to be flowering yet, but I'll try to remember to take a photo of one so you can see the difference.
 
adam johnson
Posts: 30
Location: Georgia, USA, 7b
1
kids hunting urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jay Angler wrote:How yummy the blackberries are can differ a lot from plant to plant, but they need to be quite black before they're ripe, so you'll have heavy competition from the birds!  Their low to the ground habit can make them a tripping hazard in places, so I'm known to pull them out if they're near paths we use a lot, but they're in no way endangered where we are and I leave lots of them alone, so it's just one of those compromises we all make to share the land.

We do have some of the little wild strawberries also. Yummm! They're so delicate though, the only way I've found to use them is pick straight to the mouth (or as Hubby says, "straight to the internal holding tank.) I suspect it'a a bit early to be flowering yet, but I'll try to remember to take a photo of one so you can see the difference.



that is interesting, there are a ton of raspberries and blackberries in the parks around me, but they grow upright normally as a shrub. These specific plants i found are in a common area in the neighborhood and they would not be missed if they were re-homed, i believe. I am not excellent at gardening in general yet, but i have a strong urge to transplant these, since something edible and native is always my preference. I feel like i have read that these can be considered invasive annoyances by some, are there downsides to transplanting them?
 
adam johnson
Posts: 30
Location: Georgia, USA, 7b
1
kids hunting urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jay Angler wrote:We do have some of the little wild strawberries also. Yummm! They're so delicate though, the only way I've found to use them is pick straight to the mouth (or as Hubby says, "straight to the internal holding tank.) I suspect it'a a bit early to be flowering yet, but I'll try to remember to take a photo of one so you can see the difference.



should have added, i planted some strawberries so i have seen the white blossoms, but i have not seen a wild one since i started trying permaculture, so i am unsure of the difference. I actually have a backyard covered in the false strawberries with the yellow flowers and the tasteless fruit, which i had been calling wild strawberries until my seven year old corrected me.
 
Jay Angler
gardener
Posts: 2727
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1004
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
adam johnson wrote:

I actually have a backyard covered in the false strawberries with the yellow flowers and the tasteless fruit, which i had been calling wild strawberries until my seven year old corrected me.

Gotta watch out for those 7 year olds - not an invasive species, but definitely need watching!

This link will give you some info from my eco-system : https://www.bcliving.ca/wild-about-native-blackberries
Clearly, I'm not the only one with the opinion of their tripping potential.
If you're prepared to be patient, rather than trying to dig it up, I'd put out pots in the fall and set the tips of the vines at the surface and wait for them to put a tendril out into the pot. That's how I got some thorn-less blackberry to root, just using a small rock to hold the vine tip in about the right spot. If you bury the vine tip, it's more likely to rot, as it's growth character changes when it's thinking about tip rooting. Sorry - wrong time of year to get a picture, and I couldn't find one on the web, but the vine turns a lighter colour and looks a bit lumpy and often divides into several stems.

But my eco-system is not yours, so I'm only trying to give you ideas.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1123
Location: Denmark 57N
300
fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

adam johnson wrote:

should have added, i planted some strawberries so i have seen the white blossoms, but i have not seen a wild one since i started trying permaculture, so i am unsure of the difference. I actually have a backyard covered in the false strawberries with the yellow flowers and the tasteless fruit, which i had been calling wild strawberries until my seven year old corrected me.



Wild strawberries look exactly like a dolls version of a cultivated strawberry, you'll know one when you see one!

 
We must storm this mad man's lab and destroy his villanous bomb! Are you with me tiny ad?
Greenhouse of the Future ebook - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/greenhouse
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic