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Intro/Need Opinions: What new projects in rural B&B?

 
Posts: 5
Location: Madison GA
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Greetings Forum. First post.

I'm running a B&B in rural Georgia about an hour east of Atlanta.
The place is 4 acres, about half wooded. We are trying to focus on the Earth Goddess vibe.
There is a lot of home made and upcycled furniture, there are local farmers markets and pleasant shops.

Justin Rhodes is our current role model of adorableness.

If  you were me, what permaculture projects would you start?

Current:
Herbs
Veggie Garden
Chickens
Hugelkultur Garden Box
Composting
Stupid dogs and cats

Want to do:
Worm tower
Even more composting/larger scale
Twig Crafts with an unlimited supply of free twig wood.
Van-friendly parking facilities


We would love some suggestions.  I have a big classroom and would love to conduct classes in crafting.

Ellie

 
Posts: 576
Location: Richwood, West Virginia
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If you can get numerous pallets you could set up a sample Key-hole garden filled with leaves, just to show people what can be done with all those raked leaves in the fall. Of course you'd have to help yourself to other people's curbside contributions of bagged leaves, I managed to fill about one cu/yard or one cube of the five cube Keyhole planter fabricated from pallets with leaves and then picked additional fillings so now I have 3. It doesn't have curb appeal but someone might be able to design a green house covering of some sort to provide winter veggies and hide it's glaring ugliness.



 
Ellie Cowan
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Location: Madison GA
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Thanks for suggesting, I do have a few pallets on hand and big oak trees for an annual leaf blizzard. I will try that one.
 
Ellie Cowan
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Location: Madison GA
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Hmm, that is an idea. This place is known for its peches

 
Ellie Cowan
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Location: Madison GA
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Oh yeah, probably should also say that everything has to be "adorable" since that is an important part of the experience.

If we were a bit more remote we wouldn't have to worry about appearance much.




 
master pollinator
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Location: Due to winter mortality, I stubbornly state, zone 7a Tennessee
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I just ran across this guy at Justin Rohner at Agriscaping Technologies.

His backyard looks great! I came across his stuff for gardening vertically. He uses the term elegant frequently. His stuff is pretty! His verticle stuff seems too fussy for my own tastes, needing extra watering, but I have plenty of ground space with an acre. I thought he might have pretty pictures of twig trellises I could copy. If so, I missed them.

 
gardener
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"Earth goddess vibe" makes me think of a wildflower area with a focus on edible flowers and edible "weeds." Workshops for blending wildlife into everyday life, like incorporating wild foods into meals or drinks, making plant-based paper or other plant fiber crafts, creating wildlife habitats, making fairy (or toy dinosaur) gardens. I imagine places in the woods to hang out, maybe semi-secluded off the main trails, with a rustic picnic table, a wooden swing, or a hammock.
 
gardener
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Location: South of Capricorn
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^^ these ideas are great. I just poked around your site and I could easily see some really nice raised beds, keyhole gardens, pollinator gardens added into the pictures. From there you could spin off production of herbs (and then tea, kombucha, tinctures, etc), maybe dyes, funky pollinators (butterflies, hummingbirds, different kinds of bees).
 
pollinator
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I would love to visit a place with my family that would get us closer to nature (in a way, that's what i've been trying to achieve in my own home). to that end, here's what i think of when i imagine my fantasy island rural b&b:

- Baby animals are always a win. baby chicks, baby ducks, baby goats..
- Having an experience of milking and drinking fresh milk for the first time. Most city dwellers don't know what they are missing.
- picking fruits or veggies and then using them in a cooking class
- maybe having a small aquaponics setup so visitors can learn about it?
- i don't know if this is feasible but having a jam making session and teaching how to pressure can and let the guest take one home?
- compost, different types and showing how, when its done right, it doesn't smell, attract vermin.
- making pottery
 
Tereza Okava
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Vanessa Alarcon wrote:jam making session


When my kids were little we used to camp near a place that had a nature center and jam kitchen. I took a few classes there and it was AMAZING to just do it alongside someone who knew how. Bonus, they had a gift shop that also sold the equipment you would want to make jam (pies, fillings, canning stuff, etc). They also had beehives, wildflower gardens, and some rescue animals. Today it's really different (more of a serious nature center) but the jam kitchen still does classes (http://www.thorntonburgess.org/Jam-Kitchen). I bet that would be very attractive to the right crowd.
 
Vanessa Alarcon
pollinator
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it was AMAZING to just do it alongside someone who knew how.  
That's what I'm talking about!
 
It's a pleasure to see superheros taking such an interest in science. And this tiny ad:
full time farm crew job w/ housing
https://permies.com/t/178213/jobs-offered/experiences/full-time-farm-crew-member
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