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Colocasia "Pink China" Elephant Ear or Edible Taro?

 
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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The Colocasia "Pink China" is sold as an Elephant Ear Plant that is Cold Hardy through Zone 6.
When species info is given,  it is listed as Colocasia esculenta, and the leaves show it to be a taro, not a elephant ear, but all of that is theoretical.
Does anyone have first hand knowledge of this plant?

Taro already seems like a good fit for a 5 gallon bucket garden.
Sit those bucket in a kiddy pool,  feed heavily,  harvest leaves all growing season,  harvest the buckets, store and use the root over winter,  rinse repeat.
Basically,  a potato with edible greens  which  would be awesome.

If Colocasia "Pink China"  is an edible esculenta,  then we are looking at a cold hardy (to zone 6)  root to shoot edible that also works as an indoor plant, and that would be really cool!

So,  does anyone have any knowledge of this specific variety?
 
William Bronson
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https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/colocasia-esculenta/  Lists taro and elephant ear as common names of Colocasia.

https://wimastergardener.org/article/elephant-ears-colocasia-alocasia-and-xanthosoma/ From this article, it sounds like they are all edible and pink china is listed as a variety of Colocasia.

Looks like Colocasia leaves point down:


And Alocasia and Xanthocasia leaves point up:




http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/plant-directory/colocasia-esculenta/

Taro can be distinguished from elephant ears by the attachment of the leaf from the petiole. In taro, the petiole attaches to the leaf several inches from the base of the ā€˜Vā€™ of the leaf, while the petiole is attached directly at the base in elephant ears. The leaves are light green for elephant ear and darker green in color for taro.



I think it should be edible, but having been selected for appearance, it might not taste as good as a variety selected for food. I'm sure you know it needs to be cooked thoroughly! Try it and let us know!  
 
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Xanthocasia start out rolled up into a spike, pointing up, but then go down as the leaves unroll and mature-- Alocasia seem to remain pointing up?
There seems to be so much confusion in terms of names. Here we have a few species that are lookalikes- Xanthosoma sagittifolium is used for food here, and we are oriented to avoid Colocasia antiquorum Schott as a potentially poisonous species--- and C antiquorum is synonymous for C esculenta! on top of that, they ALL seem to be generally called elephant ear or occasionally translated as taro. I suppose because we have one less toxic variety (X sagittifolium) the tendency is to avoid the others? The rule here is to only eat the one where the stem enters the leaf in the middle, not at the base, and only plants where the leaf has a border around the edge.
As mentioned, obviously, cook them all!!
Hopefully yours is really a taro. The tubers/corms on X sagitt are small, the leaves are really the main event (they make fabulous omelets) and are nutritious.
 
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