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Young tree with bark stripped off. What can I do?

 
pollinator
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Young maple tree, maybe 10 or 15 ft tall, just got its bark stripped by naughty goats.

Is there anything I could do, wrapping it in something, or some other creative idea, to save it?

ETA, I think picture is sideways, sorry, I can’t fix it right now, and have to run.

Thank you☺️
5FDA727D-D84D-412E-92F8-E8789C49D23D.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 5FDA727D-D84D-412E-92F8-E8789C49D23D.jpeg]
 
pollinator
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Liv Smith wrote:Young maple tree, maybe 10 or 15 ft tall, just got its bark stripped by naughty goats.

Is there anything I could do, wrapping it in something, or some other creative idea, to save it?

ETA, I think picture is sideways, sorry, I can’t fix it right now, and have to run.

Thank you☺️



Since the tree looks to have intact bark on one side, I wouldn't do anything. Trees generally survive that type of thing pretty easily.
 
pollinator
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It looks only half stripped. The odds are very good that it will survive. The word these days is: don't do a thing. The tree will heal itself. Putting "stuff" on it just creates a habitat for nasties.

I have had apple trees girded 60% around by mice and they came back stronger than ever, and eventually healed the entire wound over.

Last winter a porcupine got at another apple tree and took more than half the bark. (The porcupine returned; we had a chat.) We pruned the damaged portion back to reduce the stress on the tree, but it's leafing and flowering. Time will tell, but it feels right.

Of course, all of this assumes that you will keep the goats away from it in the future.
 
Liv Smith
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Douglas Alpenstock wrote:


(The porcupine returned; we had a chat.)



That is cute. Hopefully, porcupine lived to see another day?😁

Thank you for your input.

The tree is somewhat stressed out by other things around it, and it met the same naughty goats before in its life. I would like to help it, especially since I didn’t do anything for it, it just sprouted there on its own. I love when trees grow by themselves like that.

 
gardener
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My hunch is that your tree is a goner.  That's a lot of trauma for a tree to endure, and even if it makes it, that bare patch will likely become a pathway for fungi to enter the tree.

So, to answer your question "What can I do?", I say cut it down and keep it as a reminder to power-up an electric fence every time the goats are near anything of value.
 
Douglas Alpenstock
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Aha! I propose that Marco and I have a running bet.

If the the tree dies, I will donate 10 lbs. of potatoes to the local food bank.

If Marco takes the bet, and the tree survives, the "forfeit" will be of his own choosing.

It doesn't really matter, of course, and I'll donate the potatoes anyway. I just want to know how the story ends!
 
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As long as the tree isn't ringed all the way around it should recover fine.  I have had young trees stripped of all but a 1/4" strip of bark connecting top and bottom and they did pretty good.

For protection, I am a big fan of the plastic tree tubes = those are easiest to install and guard against gotas, sheep, and deer horns...
 
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I think I've seen Dr. Redhawk reccomend covering the wound with Elmer's glue to keep out infections. Maybe an application of an antibiotic tea first? I couldn't find the post quickly.
 
Marco Banks
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Douglas Alpenstock wrote:Aha! I propose that Marco and I have a running bet.

If the the tree dies, I will donate 10 lbs. of potatoes to the local food bank.

If Marco takes the bet, and the tree survives, the "forfeit" will be of his own choosing.

It doesn't really matter, of course, and I'll donate the potatoes anyway. I just want to know how the story ends!



What's your timeline?  Yes, it'll "survive" for a few years, but the gap between survive and thrive is wide enough to drive a truck through.

But I'd be thrilled to take that bet, with a pledge to double your food contribution.  May I donate sweet potatoes, as they grow really well here, while "Irish" potatoes don't do so well.  If that tree is alive in 3 years, regardless of it's condition, I'll drive 20# of sweet potatoes over to a men's shelter a few miles away from my place.






You know what goes good with roasted sweet potatoes?  Roasted goat.  Ohhh . . .
 
pollinator
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I'm having trouble seeing the photo, so this is just general advice. Depending on the shape of the stripped area, a bridge graft might help. Take some strips of inner bark from a sacrificial branch, and graft one end below the girdle, and the other above, creating a bridge so nutrients can get across. If the girdle is big (goat damage vs. mouse damage), you may want to use a pliable twig for the bridge instead of a strip of bark, but the idea is the same. It just needs living tissue to carry nutrients across that gap. The more bridges you can provide, the better.
 
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