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What’s wrong with these flowers?

 
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I put them in a month ago and the don’t seem to be growing all. They all look weak. Can someone give me some tips?
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Maybe burned with too much fertilizer, or too rich compost.
 
pollinator
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I have all my raised beds in tanks.  I’ no longer have cattle so I have tanks.  Tanks are made to hold water.  Is it possible your plants are too consistently wet?

I use a drill and a large bit to drill holes in my tanks so the soil does not remain soggy and has a chance to dry between watering. When I did not do that my plants did not prosper; they drowned.

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Sahil Budhawani
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The way I have it set up is I added a lot of wood pieces at the bottom to counter act that
 
master steward
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I have some questions that might help people give you advice.

What kind of wood did you put in the bottom of the planter?

That guage that I see in the picture is that for water? PH?

I am assuming these were transplants so maybe they are still in shock.


 
pollinator
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Sahil, I used chunks of decomposing wood in my large containers in which I'm growing tomatoes in out back. They seem to be doing good, but the beds where I used the finer decomposing wood are showing signs of nitrogen deficiency and some just aren't growing as well as in other beds.  Most of your foliage looks good but I see a few that the leaves look a bit pale.  Of course that could be due to the variety too.

The surface of the soil appears a bit dry in the photo.  Has your area been getting lots of rain this spring or are you watering?
 
Janet Reed
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Sahil Budhawani wrote:The way I have it set up is I added a lot of wood pieces at the bottom to counter act that



Well, tanks hold water and wood degrades and becomes compost.  Ala...no drainage.  Plants must have oxygen to their roots.

Planting in tanks is not like planting in the ground.  You have to use a soil mix that is light...or you cannot add excessive amounts of peat, loam etc.

Things that cause failure to thrive show differently than things like fertilizer etc.  Leaf edge damage would show something taken up by the root.

Failure to thrive could be poo4 soil composition, PH as mentioned, unhealthy plants, overwatering.

You could try a shot of B 12 to all.

Putting a few holes in might also make the difference.....

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I wonder if the plants might have been root bound in their original pots? That can cause their growth to stall out if the root ball wasn't opened up some.  Maybe try lifting one out of the tank and take a look at the roots just to see if they are sending out any new growth?
 
Janet Reed
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Judith Browning wrote:I wonder if the plants might have been root bound in their original pots? That can cause their growth to stall out if the root ball wasn't opened up some.  Maybe try lifting one out of the tank and take a look at the roots just to see if they are sending out any new growth?



There are some good gardeners here responding with the right advice....!
 
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The gardenia looks to have the most damage.  From the look in the photo it could be poor drainage, or is it getting direct afternoon sun?  May be a bit sunburned.  I think I would mulch it, and put your finger in the soil in several different places, and only water when the soil feels dry on the tip of your finger.  When gardening you have to be a bit of a detective some times, but don't give up.  Plants have an amazing ability to bounce back.  Good luck to you I hope everything begins to thrive soon.
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