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Honeyberry

 
gardener
Posts: 1400
Location: Cascades of Oregon
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I've planted about 20 blueberries on the property and added honeyberries a couple of years ago they really started producing last year. The blueberries are just beggining to bud but the honeyberries, even with the occasional dips we still have down into the freezing range, are not only in full leaf but are blosssomed out, other than rhubarb this has to be one of my hardiest plants.
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gardener
Posts: 213
Location: Clarkston, MI
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Great info thanks for posting. Honeyberry's are on my list for my food forest. Have you been able to get any berries off of them yet?
 
pollinator
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Location: North Central Michigan
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My honeyberries are still only around 8" tall..but they are in full leaf and here that is good as things are just beginning to leaf out here. (Michigan) I have high hopes for them but they need to do a LOT of growing. How long would you say yours took to grow and produce?
 
Robert Ray
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Location: Cascades of Oregon
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I actually got berries the second year. This will be the third year and there is a noticebale difference in the amount of blossoms, so the roots must have developed. Started out as 12 inch plants and are now about 3-4 foot tall. I've taken some cuttings to see if they will root as easily as blueberries. Definitely one to try if you are in an area with cool or erratic temp swings like I have in the mountains.
 
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Honeyberries, Haskap or Lonicera caerulea is a honeysuckle family plant hardy to zone 2, it blooms very early and the flowers can take solid freezes without damaging them. The fruit is ready about the same time as strawberries. They do need different cultivars to pollinate properly.
 
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