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Giant mushroom

 
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Well, pretty big anyway!  Not sure what kind - any experts care to identify?
69D75ABF-2CDE-4302-82E6-C20496F06856.jpeg
Mushroom
Mushroom
C9FD43A8-87E1-49F9-976D-42EC44F864DF.jpeg
Mushroom scale
Mushroom scale
 
pollinator
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Might be horse mushroom. Need to get a spire print and see Stalk when more mature
 
Artie Scott
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Bigger by the day!  Not sure what took a bite out of it , deer?  Woodchuck?

TJ, I think you are correct, does look like a horse mushroom.
0C0BCBA1-F301-4B17-8B6A-BEE8F85848F2.jpeg
Growing mushroom
Growing mushroom
 
Artie Scott
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A different type, but same area - these are the size of dinner plates!  Always amazing how fast they pop up.
AF94CA3A-65CC-41D0-95EF-C57190BC1723.jpeg
Mushrooms
Mushrooms
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Mushroom 2
Mushroom 2
 
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Nice pic! I love looking at mushroom photos.  I'm not good at identifying wild mushrooms but a pic of the underside showing the gills might help those that can.
 
Artie Scott
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Pic of the underside.
31DCEF79-0FA0-459E-B3D4-3B48AD357285.jpeg
Gills
Gills
 
pollinator
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The first one you posted looks like a boletus. Look underneath, does it have gills or sponge like tubes? Boletes have tubes. Crimini, Porchini, and King are all deliciously edible boletus family members, but check your local guide. They can interact poorly with alcohol.

Second one with the skinny stalk and gills. I don't know.
 
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The second one looks a lot like the Smooth Parasol- Leucoagaricus leucothites, formerly known as Lepiota naucina.

https://www.mushroomexpert.com/leucoagaricus_leucothites.html

But be sure to check the base foe a cup or bulb, because if it does have one, it could be a deadly Amanita.
We'll need a look at the gills to ID the first one.
 
Artie Scott
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The interesting thing about the first one is it turned black fairly quickly, and then released a big, very dark, almost black cloud of spores when I mowed. Like the small round puff ball mushrooms, only much bigger.
 
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The first one is a puffball It was edible when you first saw it. There are many types and they can get as big as a beach ball.
 
M.K. Dorje Sr.
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Your puffball is probably a member of the Calvatia bovista group:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calvatia_bovista

The Calvatia genus is famous for also containing the classic Giant Puffball (Calvatia gigantea), one of the largest of all mushrooms. It is quite tasty when young, but only when the flesh looks like cream cheese. In fact, young puffballs make a great tofu substitute!

 
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Skandi Rogers wrote:The first one is a puffball It was edible when you first saw it. There are many types and they can get as big as a beach ball.



I didn't realize puffballs could have stalks. Or am I thinking that big one has a stalk and it's just the way the picture was taken?

I ordered spores last year for Calvatia gigantea, the giant puffball, and had two come up in the lawn that same year. They do form the dark smoky brown spores that explode when you whack 'em. (We used to love doing that when we were kids.) I can't remember which time of year this was, but I haven't seen any this year. I do hope they come back, because I love them fried in butter.

 
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