Our 12th kickstarter is launching soon! To get the earlybird goodies, click 'notify me on launch'
Permies KickStarter DiscussionEarlybird GoodiesGet a KickStarter Kickback
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • r ranson
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Leigh Tate
stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Jay Angler
  • Nancy Reading
gardeners:
  • Beau Davidson
  • thomas rubino
  • Edward Norton

Desert willow and yuccas in a hugel

 
Posts: 88
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana
5
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Can anyone tell me how long I need to let yuccas and desert willows sit in the sun after cutting them down before I can bury them?

I don’t want them to sprout again.
 
Julie Bernhardt
Posts: 88
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana
5
  • Likes 1 Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I guess I’ll just put them out with the trash to be thrown in the landfill.
 
Posts: 20
Location: Alpine, Texas: 5,400 ft elev, desert grassland foothills
trees solar greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I"m surprised you have them in Indiana!  I'm in West Texas and yuccas are all over the place.  I would imagine at least a month for those, but that's my SENSE and not my DATA.  We've been on our 20 acres for 15 years and have knocked a few over to build various things, and the only ones that resprout are those with roots still in the ground (even under a repeat car wheel in the driveway!)  We do have some dead whole ones above ground that have never sprouted... So I don't have experience of re-burying them yet.  I'm certain, though, that you could remove all the "beard" material and bury that without fear of them sprouting... and there's a lot of that as biomass.  


 
Julie Bernhardt
Posts: 88
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana
5
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you for answering.
I need to update my profile. We moved to New Mexico a couple months ago.

I have a small lot with just desert weeds that have seeded here. We are taking out everything and planting fruit trees. The soil is just sand and clay, no worms at all. A neighbor told me I can’t  have a compost pile unless its covered because of rats and roaches so I have been burying kitchen scraps and anything I can to enrich to soil.
It’s all different than what I was used to in Indiana.
 
Posts: 34
Location: phoenix, az
6
forest garden trees greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
desert willows should flower alot and would be good to bring/ keep pollinators around. i think they smell good too
 
master steward
Posts: 9882
Location: USDA Zone 8a
2979
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would compost them as I don't think they will attract rats or roaches. Just find a corner out of the way, put them there and forget about them.

Yes, both yucca and desert willow have blooms that attract pollinators.

The deer love my yucca blooms so much that I never get to enjoy the blooms.  I get to enjoy the deer instead.
 
steward
Posts: 3005
Location: Maine, zone 5
1602
3
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've read that yucca shoots are edible and like large asparagus, though I haven't tried them yet.  I just planted a bunch of varieties of yucca this year so that I can give them a taste.
 
gardener
Posts: 497
Location: Middle Georgia, Zone 8B
280
homeschooling home care chicken food preservation cooking fiber arts
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We live in a very "non-desert" area of Georgia, which ranges from 30-40 inches of rain. We have yuccas.

If you have them and don't want them, I can see why they'd be a hassle...those things are practically unkillable!!! And if you back into one, OUCH!!

What we did to deal with yuccas is that we actually DO want them at the right of way along our front fence. (Security reasons.) So whenever we see one in the back yard, we try to dig it up with all its roots attached. Then we transplant it out front. But we're still finding stray pop-ups in the yard, even 2 years later. So we'll just keep transplanting, I suppose!!

Julie, could you have a compost tumbler? I'd imagine those might do a better job of keeping vermin away.
 
pollinator
Posts: 214
Location: South-southeast Texas, technically the "Golden Crescent", zone 9a
119
foraging books chicken food preservation fiber arts homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Howdy!
Considering that I've been told that "Compost draws rats and bugs" by several people in several states (and very different climates), I'm guessing that the person who told you that doesn't understand what a well managed compost pile can do and does not do.

Unless you're in an HOA situation, or there's some other reason why you can't do basic and traditional gardening, including setting up a compost pile, I would suggest giving  the "advice" you were given the same value as what you paid for it.
There are different circumstances in your new home, than you probably had in the different climate, but a quick contact with any local garden supply center, garden club, or state sponsored/funded extension agent will be able to help you through that.
https://bernalilloextension.nmsu.edu/mastercomposter/

Good luck!
 
World domination requires a hollowed out volcano with good submarine access. Tiny ads are optional.
Wood Gasifier Builder's Bible, Ben Peterson --ebook
https://permies.com/wiki/137967/ebooks/Wood-Gasifier-Builder-Bible-Ben
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic