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real estate deals

 
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I have good friend who bought and sold a piece of property a year or so ago and made about $20000, for the past 6 months have been helping him look for a piece of land somewhere near me to build a inexpensive native materials house since there are no building and zoning codes here except you have to put in septic system. it turns out property prices are way up and there's no where's near as many places for sale as there were just a year or so ago. well I called him last week when I found 17 ares for y'all $12000 in southeast Kentucky near the Tennessee/kentucky line. what he did find was an old delapitated house on 6 acres in north central Florida through a county tax sale for $12,000 that has potential to be worth at least $70,000 once he gets clear title, title attorney will cost about $2500. there is already power lines going to house a well and septic system. so what he has to do is rehab the house interior, using repurposed materials he estimates cost to be about $10000 and he will probably realize at least $40000 profit. and then can go looking for off grid opportunities with more acreage than the 5 or so acres he was hoping to find just a month ago.
just thought I would share this experiences as it is viable as opportunities come forth as you might look for your dream property.
 
pollinator
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Location: New Braunfels, TX, Zone 8b, multi-generational suburban homestead
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This is exactly the type of thing we're doing to multiply our equity before moving onto land!
 
pollinator
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Location: Bendigo , Australia
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That is how people got ahead in the 1960's.
It was normal to start with a small run down place, renovate it etc, sell and get a better one until eventually they obtained a house they could be happy with at minimal cost.

This idea today that people expect their first home to be "the dream" is disgraceful.
They have a mortgage thats higher than they need.

Of course my 'dream home ' would be a 1 bedroomed affair, no kitchen a BBQ area outside with a firepit that runs on old engine oil.
Stainless steel benches for dinners and engine assembly.

Triple sink arrangement so engine parts can be cleaned whilst cooking, and two ovens, one for cooking and the other for heating things to remove bearings etc.
Exterior fridges, one for food, drink etc and the other to freeze bearings etc.c
An 18 vehicle  / 30 motorcycle attached room.
Small dining area for cold days, bathroom big enough to wash motorcyles, have a sauna and a plunge pool.
gift
 
10 Podcast Review of the book Just Enough by Azby Brown
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