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Northish/central Fl fruit trees

 
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Location: 9A Marion County Fl
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Just outside of Ocala, I have fruit trees, Is there anyone on this forum that would be able to answer prob some really basic fruit tree questions. Im looking for someone with hands on experience to this are if possible. Thank-you
 
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what is the question
 
bruce Fine
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are you talking about citrus?
 
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Jason, it would help if you told us the variety of fruit you are talking about since that might help someone to reply.

I only know about plums and pears.

I have help plant these, picked the fruit, cooked and canned the fruit.

 
Jason Walter
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I apologize if I was not clear enough, I would like to ask someone that lives in my area a few questions about  trees. They would ideally have experience with fruit from their own trees.

1- I would like to know if I should continue watering my fruit trees even though we have already had a freezing night.....Here in Fl it may be freezing a single night and then 80 degrees the following day only to be followed by more freezes.

I do not know when I should stop watering my fruit trees? Many of them have been out of the pots and into the ground for several months, many of them have been in the ground less than a month and many of them only went in the ground this past weekend.

I do not know what I need to do as far as watering these trees.

I have apples, pears, peaches, plums, oranges, tangerines, lemons, kumquats, mulberries, many different varieties of these trees.

Id like to know why my peach trees are still not affected by the cold weather, some are flowering, some of my pears still have most of their leaves, same with apples, some of my plums are almost completely defoliated, some dont look like they know its cold outside, still all their leaves.

Id like to know if I did a bad thing by putting a large healthy mulberry tree in the ground only 2 weekends ago and have a bad frost kill every leaf on it, the plant appears dead now. It stands about 8 ft high and went from a large pot into the ground only to be frozen by a bad frost.

Thats enough for now, thanks
 
Jason Walter
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Anne Miller wrote:Jason, it would help if you told us the variety of fruit you are talking about since that might help someone to reply.

I only know about plums and pears.

I have help plant these, picked the fruit, cooked and canned the fruit.



I would like to learn canning, my mother and father did it when I was young, I paid no attention, I know we had no money, they used canning jars and a stovetop. Can you tell me where I might find very simple to understand introductory to canning without getting nuts on buying fancy equipment that really isnt necessary.
 
Anne Miller
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This has a link to download this publication, go to "Get it here":

https://permies.com/wiki/100765/USDA-Complete-Guide-Home-Canning

A stockpot with a lid can be used as a canner.

 
bruce Fine
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I would suggest that though the dry season a good soaking once a week should be plenty. by a soaking I mean enough water so it goes past the bottom of root ball by a little.
you want the roots to reach down as well as out.
 
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Jason Walter wrote:
Id like to know why my peach trees are still not affected by the cold weather, some are flowering, some of my pears still have most of their leaves, same with apples, some of my plums are almost completely defoliated, some dont look like they know its cold outside, still all their leaves.


Not sure what zone you are but it's probably close to my 9b, we also have very back-and-forth weather.
My plum and red mulberries drop their leaves at least twice a year, not much rhyme or reason (commonly it is due to hail, windstorm, or random abuse). The white mulberries do not. In fact the red mulberries often look put-upon and miserable for no reason I can gather, then they come back gangbusters and fruit up nicely, so I woudn't worry.
My aunt (same zone) has a peach that keeps its leaves through most of the year. My oranges, tangerines, and lemons keep their leaves all the time, but the kumquat also is a drama queen and sheds for no reason I can understand. With most plants the answer is generally to give them some time.

I would keep watering while it's dry, maybe through the spring. I have a blood orange I put in a year ago and I only water it when the weather is dry (when other plants are looking a bit wilty). But if I remember correctly your soil is pretty sandy, so you may need more-- I've got heavy clay and a lot of compost in the soil already.
 
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Greetings from Osceola County.  Follow this guy on youtube and he probably has everything you can ever want to know.  He is based in Spring Hill just north of Tampa.

https://m.youtube.com/user/GreenDreamsFL
 
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