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Weed ID please

 
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After at least four overnight lows of 26 deg F, this weed continues to giggle at all the other greenery that is now brownery.  

Even my beloved comfrey is darkening.  But not this guy.  This, chickweed, and what I believe is nettle, are all that's left growing out there.

What is this weed?  Dock perhaps?

weed1.jpg
[Thumbnail for weed1.jpg]
weed2.jpg
[Thumbnail for weed2.jpg]
 
pollinator
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I usually need an app to tell me the ones with which I am not personally familiar, but I have found that, since starting to use one, my plant identification skills have jumped. Insect, too, actually.

Looks somewhat dandelion-esque, don't you think? The ones I am familiar with are similarly hardy, first-up and last out, pretty much, but I would expect to see spade-shaped tips, and a somewhat serrated edge to the leaves. Though I suppose it could be a cultivated variety, like and italian chicory or something.

I will be interested to find out. Good luck, and keep us posted.

-CK
 
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yep, dock.
 
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If it was where I live, it would be curly dock weed.  It grows near nettles and you can use the juice to subdue the sting.  
 
pollinator
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It does not look like th European Rumex, but more like Yellow Rumex.
However, the middle spine irritates me. It is quite strong and light-coloured, and the overall leave texture is quite smooth, so I would say a wild Chicory variety. I have those in the garden and they look very much alike.

Check where the root begins. For dock, it just tapers down and is not really visible whereas for Chicory you find something like a swollen top (like a carrot).
 
Anita Martin
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Another thought: Try a tiny bit of the leave. Neither rumex nor chicory are toxic, but the chicory will taste VERY bitter.
 
Gary Numan
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Thanks for the replies everyone.



>> I usually need an app to tell me the ones with which I am not personally familiar

Same here, my go-to is the iNaturalist app, but it didn't identify the photo I took, though I'm now thinking I simply didn't take a good enough pic.



>> Check where the root begins. For dock, it just tapers down and is not really visible.

It just tapers down, no carrot-top.  


Gotta be a dock.  

 
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Around here, curled dock has more reddish colors to it, but it definitely looks like it. Maybe the cool weather keeps it greener. It's very healthy, but I think it tastes terrible. Maybe I need to try to find some in cool weather. That in your picture looks more lush and less leathery that I'm used to finding.
 
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Looks like dock
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