• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • jordan barton
  • Carla Burke
  • Leigh Tate
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean
  • Steve Thorn

Water container suggestions?

 
Posts: 54
Location: Quarryville, PA
1
cat chicken homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We had a galvanized waterer which worked well for about 4 years, but it began to rust, so we bought this one - https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07BH57GSK?psc=1&ref=ppx_yo2_dt_b_product_details
Our criteria were that it should be plastic (no rust), have mostly good reviews, and be made in the USA.
After just 3 months it has begun to leak. So it's going in the trash (we're not able to recycle things like this where we live), and we need a new one. What experiences have you all had? Is there one you recommend?
Thanks!
 
Posts: 128
Location: King William, VA
20
dog forest garden trees cooking food preservation homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I bought this one back in February, and so far so good!  Very heavy duty and the chickens figured out the nipple within minutes.  I also like the plug in heater for the winter as well!

https://www.premier1supplies.com/p/heated-poultry-waterer?gclid=Cj0KCQjwh_eFBhDZARIsALHjIKdnrEiT4cFOwlY69hzHsuJ_utvjHo4PZOuEQvZccNwxRO6NaEyxew8aAlaIEALw_wcB
 
pioneer
Posts: 85
Location: Colombia - Tropical dry forest
45
forest garden fish fungi trees tiny house earthworks bee solar woodworking greening the desert homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We started with big plastic water containers and due to the drastic desert like changes in temperature we get here the plastic expanded and contracted constantly and in about six months began to leak. We then built a big concrete water tank to gravity feed from uphill and has been a great investment. It can be a bit costly but it will last a long time and it’s very easy to maintain.

Here is a vid where Geoff explains other good attributes for it like keeping the water alkaline and other details:

 
gardener
Posts: 4485
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1666
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We've used a variety!
1. For a long time, our layers used a chunk of PVC pipe (4") with end caps and a slot cut in the top about a quarter of the circumference - wide enough for chicken heads and cleaning. We hung these from the side of their portable shelter and used either a hose or a bottle of water to fill them. Relatively cheap and long lasting.
2. For our meat birds, we use one of the 5 gallon with a lid at the top that seals, rather than the bayonet style the OP linked to. The lids fail regularly, but at least you can buy them as replacement parts. The little cap that you need to put on the output while filling it are harder to get replacements for, but luckily, we've never lost any (we did find one plastic container than had a matching size). These are still fiddly and annoying to clean.
3. Open bucket: These are easy to clean, but you need to find ones which are not too high, but are wide so they don't tip. They work for our layers and adult ducks, but I have to match the bucket size to the poultry when they're young, so we usually start off with a commercial one. This winter, we had more freezing weather than we commonly get, and filling the PVC waterers was taking too much time and they had too much surface area to volume. Hubby had bought some rubber buckets for another purpose and my son (whose job it was to water the chickens) switched the birds over to them and it's stuck. They're easy to clean, easy to carry, and I'd already been using pans of similar material as "duckling bathtubs" and they last a very long time even if left in the sun. The handles are metal, so they don't break. We use 2 in case they tip one, but if you have a way to put a hook on the wall, you so you can trap the handle, tipping is less of an issue, although I wish I could find a rubber one with a larger footprint for its height without it being too large to easily carry. Ours are similar to this: https://www.amazon.com/MARSHALLTOWN-Premier-Line-DF12-Heavyweight/dp/B000ASD5LI/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=rubber+buckets&qid=1623079192&sr=8-2
4. At one point Hubby bought a bunch of "cup style" poultry waterers and we installed 3 on a bucket as a test. I would not use these. Not only were the cups awkward to clean, they were easy for the birds to kick bedding, rocks, dirt etc into the cup and if the little rubber trigger got jammed in the open position, it would drain the whole bucket.  We're on a deep well, so anything that qualifies as an "automatic" waterer runs the risk of a build up of minerals which are not only hard to clean, they tend to cause the systems to leak.  I'd be totally willing to try the buckets with the nipple system such as Joshua LeDuc linked to if we didn't have such hard water.
 
Joshua LeDuc
Posts: 128
Location: King William, VA
20
dog forest garden trees cooking food preservation homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes.  My friend who sells chicken, goat, and pork for a living buys his own nipples and screws them into a 5 gallon bucket, then hangs from a tripod.  That would work well if you have a lot of chickens like he does.  
 
pollinator
Posts: 243
Location: Middle Georgia, Zone 8B
91
homeschooling home care chicken food preservation cooking fiber arts
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I use a plain old dishtub. The kind you set inside your kitchen sink for washing dishes. It's easy to clean and refill, several birds can use it at one time, and it doesn't tip over easily. If your birds do tip it over, try putting a brick or a stone inside it for extra weight.
 
Jay Angler
gardener
Posts: 4485
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1666
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Stacie Kim wrote:I use a plain old dishtub. The kind you set inside your kitchen sink for washing dishes. It's easy to clean and refill, several birds can use it at one time, and it doesn't tip over easily. If your birds do tip it over, try putting a brick or a stone inside it for extra weight.

A friend gave me some of these when she was downsizing, however they were the cheap dollar-store variety and they went brittle and cracked after a single summer of sun exposure. Something like the stainless warming trays from buffet tables would be much longer-lasting and a similar shape. Yes, more expensive, but I'm getting pretty worried about all the plastic humans are making and not "unmaking" - at least metal has some hope of being recycled.
 
Stacie Kim
pollinator
Posts: 243
Location: Middle Georgia, Zone 8B
91
homeschooling home care chicken food preservation cooking fiber arts
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So true, Jay!
I often see those stainless steel buffet dishes at thrift stores. It might be wise to pick up a few for later chicken usage.
I've also used ceramic plant saucers. They don't hold as much water though, so they need to be refilled more often. I didn't like them for that fact.
gift
 
The Greenhouse of the Future ebook by Francis Gendron
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic