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Need New Wood Stove

 
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I just discovered this week while cleaning out my little wood stove that the bottom of the stove is starting to burn out. There are three quarter size holes in the bottom in a line. I tried putting a brick inside but it is not wide enough. Needless to say, this will curtail my efforts this winter unless I can get a new stove installed.

I'm looking at the Guide Gear Large Wood Stove
https://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/guide-gear-large-outdoor-wood-stove?a=2233231

I have the smaller one and it worked great for about 3 years. This new one is much bigger, will have a damper and a sealed door plus I would get their kit which has a grate for the bottom so hopefully it won't burn out as quickly. The issue I'm having is the stove pipe is 5.5 inch diameter, which is fine. But I need at least one 90 degree elbow. I can't seem to find a 5.5 inch elbow anywhere online.

I've considered venting with 6 inch stove pipe and attaching it to the stove collar with some screws. Not sure how well that will work. Any ideas on this? Is 5.5 inch an odd size? Anyone know where I get find a 5.5 inch 90 degree elbow online?

Isaac

 
pollinator
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Location: Canadian Prairies - Zone 3b
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Your stove may have years of life left. One trick for repairing a stove bottom is to set in a chunk of sheet metal (whatever you can scrounge) and pack in 1-2 inches of damp clay. Fire it slowly at first. This will harden to a near brick like consistency. Adding a chunk of sheet metal on top of the clay makes ash removal easier.

The clay trick also helps prevent burnout in a new stove. For stoves that are moved all the time, some use local sand/gravel in the bottom and dump it before moving.

I've never seen a 5.5" stove pipe. 5" and 6" are widely available. I would go with 6" but note that it may draw more aggressively than you're used to.
 
Isaac Hunter
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I thought about repaying it with a piece of sheet metal, but I'm not certain where I would find something like that. I'll look online. I could also fill in the holes and then fill the bottom of the stove with sand, which I have plenty of since my camp is on the banks of a lake. I will try this and see how it holds up while I'm looking for a metal plate. Thanks for the tips.
 
Douglas Alpenstock
pollinator
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Scrap sheet metal is free for the taking. It doesn't have to be pretty or a precise size. Several smaller pieces can overlap.

The list is endless: construction sites, demolition sites, metal working shops, HVAC contractors, junkyards, recycling depots, appliance installers (front of a discarded dishwasher), roofing contractors, any established farm or acreage ...
 
Isaac Hunter
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Actually, if I remember right, there is a metal plate in my stack of lumber ends. I assume it was a plate off of the old deck the previous owner had on top of the pilings. I will have to do some searching....
 
Douglas Alpenstock
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Sometimes a discarded cookie sheet (for baking) or a broiler pan from a conventional oven fits nicely. Bonus: when it's clean-out time you can lift them out ashes and all.
 
Isaac Hunter
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Now that is a really, really good idea. I just happen to have an old one in my oven!
 
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You could also spend a bit more and get a stove actually meant to be used in a house.  It will be far safer far more efficient and if maintained properly last you decades.
 
Douglas Alpenstock
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Ben Holler wrote:You could also spend a bit more and get a stove actually meant to be used in a house.  It will be far safer far more efficient and if maintained properly last you decades.


I don't entirely disagree, having done that and enjoyed it for 15 years. Still, keep in mind that the up-front costs for a good stove and proper chimney setup are not cheap. Not everyone has that kind of cash laying around. Tread gently, good sir.
 
Isaac Hunter
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Yes, I understand the rationale here. But these house stoves are usually quite heavy and large in size. The location of my camp is on the back side of a lake and I am by myself. I would first have to get it from my car (oh, and I only have a  compact car to transport it with) across the parking lot at the public dock, down the ramp, into my kayak (that won't work, I'll have to rent a boat) and then haul it across the lake to my dock. Then cart it up my ramp and gang plank to my current workshop/shelter.

Additionally, wood stoves that are designed or rated for homes are very expensive from what I've seen. It's the difference between $300 and $1200-$1500. I have money to spend but there is a limited amount.  

Also, the stove I currently have has done a great job. With a few tweeks, I think I could extend the life of the next one, especially now since the new tips I've gotten from this forum will be interesting to see how much more life I can squeeze out of my current stove. If I could extend another winter out of the little stove I have that will be great.  

There may come a time when I make the effort (and shell out the cost) for a much larger stove, but at this time I don't think it is warranted. Though I have been eyeing the old wood stove on my neighbor's deck on the other side of the lake. Not sure if there is something wrong with it or if he just didn't want to go through the trouble of cutting firewood. Not to mention I haven't seen them at their place in I think 2 years.

What I don't understand is why these camp stoves or tent stove manufactures are bent on using odd ball stove pipe. The first stove I was looking at was a 2 inch diameter pipe. To get elbows for it you had to go to a muffler shop to get a tailpipe crimped to the right angle. The one I purchased has a 3" pipe with no elbows. But a duravent 3" elbow was close, but one end I had to mangle to get it to fit (and it doesn't look pretty, but at least it works). This new one I'm looking at has a 5.5inch pipe. A retailer online said he'd never heard of a stovepipe that size before! Why not just make the stove pipe 5" or 6"? Why make it so difficult for the end user to have to custom fab something together?  I think I will be able to use 6" pipe instead and just secure it to the stove collar with some screws. But it will be trial and error at best. I realize these types of stoves are mostly for tents where the jack is in the roof, but I've seen several winter tents that have jacks in the side, too.  

I guess that's what happens when your civilization begins to die. Odd stove pipe sizes.

Isaac
 
Ben Holler
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Ok so in your case I would recommend finding an good older used cast iron stove.   They can easily be found for around 500. Take it apart into panels for easy transport and reassemble on site.

Also I hope you are using actual chimney pipe not just stove pipe.
 
gardener
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Location: Geraldton, Ontario -Zone 1b
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hugelkultur forest garden foraging tiny house wood heat
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Isaac Hunter wrote: Why not just make the stove pipe 5" or 6"? Why make it so difficult for the end user to have to custom fab something together?  I think I will be able to use 6" pipe instead and just secure it to the stove collar with some screws. But it will be trial and error at best.

I guess that's what happens when your civilization begins to die. Odd stove pipe sizes.

Isaac



The hardware store where I live has a crimping tool that they loan out and people use it to adapt oddball ducts to fit each other.

 
Ben Holler
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Yeah that isn't going to make up 1/2".   I use them all the time and you can get 1/4" with them.  An adapter will be needed for 5.5 to 6".   Good chimney suppliers should have them
 
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