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Bushfires & PH.

 
pioneer
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Hey,

I see patterns of bushfire prone areas and acidic soils,
I think this makes sense!

Can anyone comment in regards to why this may or not be true?

Regards,
Alex
 
pollinator
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I don't know that there is a hard and fast connection.

In my part of the world, forests on acidic soil tend to be softwoods/conifers, which are more vulnerable to wildfires. Forest management practices that kill off the hardwoods are part of that mix, though.

On the other hand, the grasslands of the prairies/great plains in North America are on a limestone base, so are generally basic (alkaline). Yet they were subject to regular, massive wildfires since the glaciers retreated. That's part of the reason they are so productive -- 10,000 years of biochar.
 
pollinator
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This may be a start
Bush fires and soils
I normally I read all references I put here, but this paper is heavy duty!

There was a Spanish study that found grass fires had an effect as well.
BUT I did google this " bushfire prone areas and acidic soils" and got a lot appear.
 
gardener
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This is one of those subjects where your results may vary, applies. In conifer forests acidity will be higher. But! Most ash will add a base component as rains leach the ash into the soil, it will not change the acidity because the root systems won't have burned completely which allows for a dying release of acidic exudes. Hard wood forests produce highly basic ash (soap producing lye) if it's a mixed forest then expect patches of alkaline soil and patches of acidic soil.

Redhawk
 
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