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Not yarrow, what is it? ID a plant

 
steward & bricolagier
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Location: SW Missouri
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It's not yarrow. 99.9% odds on that. I can ID yarrow.
It's amok. It's early May, still too cold to plant tomatoes, and this stuff is hip high.
It's flowering, itty itty bitty flowers.
It's definitely not edible, I have tasted it multiple times, at various stages of growth. Still yuck.
It's eating my garden. If it's not a medicinal, I'm gonna have to cull it.
I don't want to cull them and then find out they were something awesome.
Zone 6 A/B, southern Missouri.
Help!
Pics should be able to be enlarged.

:D

Not yarrow. The board behind it is 24 inches high


Not yarrow. Ferny soft leaves


Not yarrow. It's flowering


Not yarrow. Look how TINY the blooms are!

 
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Achillea millefolium grows up to 3 feet tall and the flowers can vary greatly in size...
 
William Kellogg
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Leaves taste bitter, (toxic to pets and horses), and can be invasive in the garden...
 
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Location: Central Indiana, zone 6a, clay loam
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I visited my friend the other day and saw a plant that looked like that, also about hip high. I was very surprised to learn it was yarrow. The one I have stays short and hugs the ground. I wonder if it's a different cultivar or something? Or perhaps different conditions creating different growth habits?
 
William Kellogg
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Probably different soil, moisture, and sun aspect.

On a positive note it attracts butterflies!

 
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