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Anyone make their own clothes?  RSS feed

 
Randy Gibson
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I need clothes for my daughter who's not a typical size. Are there any sources for atypical clothes sizes?

Thank you.
 
Brenda Groth
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Location: North Central Michigan
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there are books (i got some on Amazone) on altering clothes that are really good.. New from Old Emerson Wardrobe Quick Fixes Saunders

otherwise there are a lot of easy sewing patterns avail.
 
Tyler Ludens
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Craftster sewing forums are a very helpful place to find advice or even to find a seamstress to make clothes for your daughter: http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?board=348.0
 
David Mcgowan Hicks
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If your daughter is fond of skirts and dresses, sewing her clothes should be very simple. I am not much of a sewer, but I can bang out a pleated wrap dress in a couple of hours from scratch. Sadly, I dont really wear dresses. Trousers are terra incognita for me.
 
Randy Gibson
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She does not even own a skirt or dress!!

Pants and mostly sleeveless shirts. Thanks for all of the replies and tips! Randy
 
Rion Mather
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What is the best way to learn how to make your own clothes?
 
Fatima Shajarataddurr
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Yeah, I totally make my own clothes. I make everything except shoes (and a couple of times, have even made those). To learn sewing tips and techniques, I suggest you visit sewing.patternreview.com, burdastyle.com, and just start going to youtube.com and watching videos. If you live where you can go to a public library, there should be available books.

Now about your daughter being an atypical size, if you give us more details, I can try to give some design help. For most people you're going to learn some fit techniques by which you can alter standard patterns for each person. For some people (thinking achondroplasia or other types of significant difference), you may need to learn pattern drafting skills.

 
Randy Gibson
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4'10
113 lbs
32 26 34

broad shoulders (for a small lady)
 
Fatima Shajarataddurr
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You should, with a little pattern adaptation, be able to sew for her easily. I went to the Simplicity size charts http://www.simplicity.com/t-sewing-measurement-charts.aspx#misspetite and could clearly see her measurements in the size 10 range (pattern size 10, not regular clothes size 10) in the Misses Petite. Even the petite will still be a little long, you will learn where on her specific body the length needs to be removed. Then you will make the shoulder adjustment such as in this video: http://thepetitesewist.blogspot.com/2011/10/narrowwide-shoulder-pattern-adjustment.html
 
Randy Gibson
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thank you, I will have her research the links you gave me. Do you make clothes to sell? How far are you from Oklahoma? :>
 
Fatima Shajarataddurr
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No, I don't make clothes to sell, it's a labor of love. If I were near Oklahoma, I'd be thrilled to help you - but I'm in Abu Dhabi, alas.
 
Randy Gibson
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Abu Dahbi! I see there was quite a fire there.

On another note, my daughter wants loose fitting desert clothes, I bet you could help if we were closer together.

Best wishes, Randy
 
Gryphon Corpus
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I'm late to this party, but if you don't sew at all yet, I would recommend finding a shop near you that has some basic classes. Books are very helpful once you have the basics down, but they can't teach you how to handle a sewing machine and fabric, how to place pins or hold the threads, or any of those little details. A couple classes should be enough to get you started to a point where you can navigate a pattern on your own. If your daughter likes loose, desert-style clothes, that's good - not much shaping involved! Here's a really nice example:

http://www.miklagard.nvg.org.au/costume/rus/trader/kaftan_pattern.htm

Next question - do you or she knit?? Endless possibilities there...
 
jacque greenleaf
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Location: Burton, WA (USDA zone 8, Sunset zone 5) - old hippie heaven
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Here's an old hippie classic - http://emersonmerrick.blogspot.com/2008/11/illustrated-hassle-free-make-your-own.html

The same authors did a sequel titled Son of the illustrated etc

No patterns necessary. They talk about hand-sewing as well as machine sewing.

When I was growing up, sewing your own was the cheapest way to go. These days, if you consider only the cash outlay, W****t is cheaper than making your own. But most of the clothes are crap, not meant to last.

You can teach yourself to hand sew pretty easily - all you need to know to start is a back stitch and a running stitch, I'd be astounded if there are no online illustrations. And basic sewing machine isn't hard to learn either. The caveat is that there are lots of crappy sewing machines out there that will always be slightly annoying to use, and you'll think it's you, when it's not.

Basic sewing classes are still taught through community education programs, so look around. If you can afford $300-$500 for a sewing machine, buy it at a sewing machine dealer that offers classes. At that price, I think a Bernina would be your best bet, either a new or reconditioned machine.

Do you have a friend that sews?

Here's a thought - be adventurous. Go to a thrift store, buy some t-shirt style tops in good fabric that are too large for the ultimate wearer - then cut the pieces apart along the seam lines, study how they're put together, then try altering them to fit. Unsuccessful attempts can always be used for paint clothes! Do that a few times, you'll learn a lot.
 
Yone' Ward
Posts: 135
Location: Springdale, WA USA - Cold Mediterranean Climate
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Start simple and don't be afraid of making mistakes. If you find a pattern that almost fits, make notes on what needs to be different, get a role of sturdy paper and using the pattern and your notes, and cut out your own pattern. It's not hard, it's just a matter of not being intimidated.
 
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