• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • Leigh Tate
  • paul wheaton
  • Nicole Alderman
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Beau Davidson
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean
  • Nancy Reading
gardeners:
  • thomas rubino
  • Casie Becker
  • Mike Barkley

Landrace question

 
Posts: 348
Location: SW Missouri
72
hugelkultur duck trees chicken pig bee solar wood heat
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Greetings!

I’ve read the landrace seed book by Joseph lofthouse.

I have a question.

I live in zone 6b with a hot dry summer.

Do you create seperate seed banks for spring gardening and fall gardening?  I have selected a bunch of seeds to save that did awesome with no irrigation in a hot dry summer, but our climate will change completely for the fall.  Am I attempting to breed seeds that will do both or have two seperate seed banks?
 
steward
Posts: 5778
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
2376
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

In the pragmatic world in which I find myself, it's easier to only keep one landrace per species. By planting one landrace in both the spring, and in the fall, I am selecting for a population that can be reliable in either scenario. There might be a cost associated with that choice in that populations selected for only fall or spring might yield somewhat more. The simplification in record keeping and seed saving entices me to keep only one population per species.

There are a lot of environmental and gardener influences on a population that will be the same regardless of whether they are spring or fall planted. If I were keeping two populations, I would plant some seeds from each population with every planting, in order to maintain diversity, and to share adapted traits between populations.
 
pollinator
Posts: 483
Location: SE Indiana
271
dog fish trees writing
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Eric Hammond wrote:Greetings!
Do you create seperate seed banks for spring gardening and fall gardening?  I have selected a bunch of seeds to save that did awesome with no irrigation in a hot dry summer, but our climate will change completely for the fall.  Am I attempting to breed seeds that will do both or have two seperate seed banks?



I often plant different things at different times. For example, I'll soon be direct seeding carrots, onions, and various brassicas in spots where corn and beans are just about finished maturing. Yes, many will think it's a bit weird to direct seed those things in July or August, but it's been working well for me.

I've also been striving for several years to reduce maturity time as much as possible in all of my crops. When it comes to the same species for example with beans, corn and tomatoes, and in a climate similar to you yours, I've been working on growing two generations in one season. A couple days ago I direct planted small patches of all of those from mature seed that I harvested a few days before.

It's all the same seed though, I don't keep those planted in early May separated from those planted in late July. I do that mostly in an effort to develop varieties that can be planted pretty much anytime, thereby extending the window of opportunity to start over in the event an early planted crop is lost for some reason.  


 
Posts: 90
13
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I agree with all that has been said above, but I will add one thought for consideration...It depends on your specific goals.

For example, if I am growing two sweet corn crops in a year, and one of my goals is to develop a more cold/wet germination/seedling tolerance for earlier planting, then those conditions can only be selected for in the first planting of the year.  The conditions are simply too different in July with it's 100+ degree heat and differing sunlight/pest conditions.  

Ideally, as Joseph said above, you could still plant your one landrace of early/cold/wet germinating seed in July, then select for other traits like drought tolerance.  This would, over time, refine your mix to both extremes, making a pretty hardy corn.

In my case, I'm experimenting with a mixture of about 20 varieties of sweet corn, some hybrids and some OP for my second crop.  I had a real difficult time with mice digging up and eating my seed, which wasn't an issue at all for the early planting.  So, each time I replanted the "holes," I just kept planting different varieties with different DTM over the course of a few weeks.  I'm to the point now, where I have a nice stand of corn (albeit with some "holes" in my rows).  They are all different varieties, and the beginnings of my own sweetcorn landrace.  I know I have many more years worth of selective seed saving before I get the results I'm working toward, but it's fun nonetheless.  Now if I could only find more land to plant in corn, this project could grow exponentially...
 
rubbery bacon. rubbery tiny ad:
177 hours of video: the 2017 Permaculture Design Course and Appropriate Technology Course
https://permies.com/wiki/65386/hours-video-Permaculture-Design-Technology
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic