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Whats the best way to learn permaculture?  RSS feed

 
Jamie Lotz
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Hey everyone,
One of my goals for 2013 is to learn much much more about permaculture. I'll be doing self-study (books, dvd, youtube, etc) as opposed to attending a PDC. Might do a PDC at some point, but with kids and a wife, getting time away is tough.
My question is, how would you suggest I begin to learn the concepts of permaculture? What books/DVD's/youtube videos/podcasts/websites/magazines/etc have you found helpful?

Thanks for your advice!
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Here are some of my favorites in addition to permies.com. Not all are permaculture specifically, but I have found them helpful:

http://www.permaculturenews.org/

http://permaculturenews.org/2012/06/01/zaytuna-farm-video-tour-apr-may-2012-ten-years-of-revolutionary-design/

http://www.happyearth.com.au/

http://milkwood.net/

PRI "Establishing a Food Forest" DVD http://www.permaculturenews.org/store/cartview.html?id=2 many parts are on Youtube, but I think it is worth it to buy the whole thing!

Amazing Urban Permaculture Food Forest Garden http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GXEcjWE_Xjs

http://www.youtube.com/user/growingyourgreens

http://www.eattheweeds.com/

http://urbanhomestead.org/journal/

http://www.permacultureprinciples.com/
 
Paul Cereghino
gardener
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Location: South Puget Sound, Salish Sea, Cascadia, North America
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Mollison's 'Permaculture Design Manual'
Fukuoka's 'One Straw Revolution'
Here's my geoff lawton video fan page
http://stewardshipinstitute.info/wiki/index.php?title=Geoff_Lawton
 
Isaac Hill
gardener
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Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
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I recommend Permaculture: Principles and Pathways Beyond Sustainability by David Holmgren for a thorough look into the philosophy behind permaculture, I really cannot recommend this highly enough, it is a very useful book for developing the thinking patterns which hold pc together. It is an easy read but really delves into the heart of the matter.

Edible Forest Gardens vol 1 & 2 by Dave Jacke and Eric Toensmeier is another book that I highly recommend. These books are basically the bible of how to design a food forest.

Of course Mollison’s Designer’s Manual is the crux of the biscuit and must be read.
 
laura sharpe
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I will check out some of these posts but i always seem to have an opinion.... do some of it is the best learning.

No matter what anyone tells you, doing it will show you if it works for you and your area. Don't be afraid of mistakes
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
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Here's a lecture I like, by toby hemenway, author of "gaia's garden": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8nLKHYHmPbo
 
Isaac Hill
gardener
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Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
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But yeah, you have to also be practicing and experimenting with permaculture in the real world too. I have about an acre of land that I have been working on for 2 years and I interned at a 25 yr old permaculture farm all summer and that has helped tremendously.
 
Paul Cereghino
gardener
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Location: South Puget Sound, Salish Sea, Cascadia, North America
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I am increasingly thinking that one of the challenges of studying Permaculture is to stop thinking of it as a gardening technique.
 
Paulo Bessa
pollinator
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Location: Portugal (zone 9) and Iceland (zone 5)
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Books: the ones mentioned already. Some of them are cheap if bought in amazon.

Websites: permies.com www.pfaf.org www.perennialsolutions.org and many others

It is possible to find sometimes online the pdfs from Bill Mollisson permaculture volume. Browse blogs and the words permaculture, self-sufficiency, fukuoka, perennial vegetables, forest gardens, etc. Watch many of the existent youtube videos (for example, on forest gardens or eat the weeds series)

With the above sources you will find PLENTY of information to teach yourself, for FREE.
But the very best way to learn is to PRACTICE yourself what you read.

Start a small garden and experiment with both annuals and perennials. Buy perennial seeds yourself (at ebay for example, agroforestry.co.uk or chilternseeds) and experiment with them. Plant fruit trees from,store bought fruits. It is easy. Walk on different landscapes (forests, wetlands, prairies) and learn how nature does, so you can design your garden similarwise. Include the typical permaculture plants.
 
S Bengi
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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The very best way is by planting a ten foot wide garden along your back fence (10ftX100ft). You can always add more seeds or even dig up fruit trees, if you need to revise. best part it is very cheap.
You could plant vines on the fence and 7ft from that plant fruit trees. Thats 24 plant species with 10ft spacing/height, that level of biodiversity is on par with tropical rainforests. And you can still add onion/strawberries/herbs under the trees at least for the 1st 5 years.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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Location: North Central Michigan
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absolutely the ones mentioned above..my favorite book is Gaia's Garden by Toby Hemenway (revised ) ...also The Country Living Encyclopedia by Carla Emery, One Straw Revolution, M Fukoka, and my earliest intro to Permaculture was Introduction to Permaculture by Bill Mollison (in the 1970's), there are lots more but I'd say go with what you have right now mentioned..that will get you thru the winter
 
please buy my thing and then I'll have more money:
The Earth Sheltered Solar Greenhouse Book by Mike Oehler - digital download
https://permies.com/wiki/23444/digital-market/digital-market/Earth-Sheltered-Solar-Greenhouse-Book
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