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Black Salsify / Scorzonera hispanica L from root?

 
                  
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Scorzonera hispanica L

http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Svartrot

Anybody have experience growing Black, also known as spanish, salsify from root?
Got some tasty roots from the local organic coop with some sprouting tiny roots at the bottom, thinking about chopping up and planting them.
Plants for the future and all sources online talk about seed propagation only...
 
Charlie Michaels
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bringing this thread back because I'm interested in scorzonera. Has anyone grown them?

What I want to know is if you can leave them in the ground for 5-6 years and the root will still be edible. Also, what is the lifespan of this plant?

 
tel jetson
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Location: woodland, washington
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a friend close by grows it as an annual from seed.  he raves about it.  he harvests it all each year, though, so I can't speak to it's longevity.  my suspicion is that after the first year, the root will get substantially tougher so it might be better used for leaves.  I'm planning on trying it this year, as well, so I would also be interested to hear others' experiences.
 
Leila Rich
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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I'm growing salsify this season and have scorzonera seed coming.
It's still too young to eat, but I have read it's one of the few roots that doesnt go inedibly tough with age. Apparently the flowers are tasty and insects love them too.
I don't know what I was expecting, but at the moment the tall, strappy leaves remind me of skinny jonquils.
I've never eaten it, but if it really tastes like a cross between a parsnip and an oyster, it's a guaranteed hit!
 
                                              
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Does everyone know if they have a more wild form of it, or something selectively bred? I was reading about breeding done with it before and it was mentioned how they were breeding for the roots to be mostly under the plant rather then spread out. Also a thicker tuber. I was never sure if such work was available though?
 
                            
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Growing Black Salsify for the first time this year. If it turns out great, I may continue to have it as a mainstay in the garden. I hear the greens from this plant are excellent. It sounds like a perfect permaculture fit, a perennial plant that produces edible greens and roots which don't become inedible.

If I like Black Salsify enough, I may try breeding it (Im a new to breeding, but sounds like this plant would be a worthy project).
 
Michael Radelut
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Location: Germany, 7b-ish
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I prefer scorzonera to asparagus; they're just wonderful.
Round here they getting a bad rap because they were forced onto people when they were kids

There are conflicting opinions floating around about whether you can still eat them after they've flowered; it may depend on how good your soil is.
If you're planning on using the seeds, be mindful of not only harvesting from the specimens that flower very early; it may lead to a deterioration in taste.
Replanting should be possible, but they tend to bleed out very quickly if bruised.

And lastly: Don't start scratch-peeling them with rubber gloves on, turning the whole kitchen into a mess !
Wash them and steam them, then you can peel off the skin without much hassle (and without gloves).
 
                            
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Location: Pennsylvania, Zone 5B
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Is anyone using them as a leaf crop? I just got some seed a little bit ago. It's not afraid to germinate that's for sure.
 
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