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hugelkultur strawberries?

 
Willy Walker
Posts: 89
Location: Foot of the Mountain, Front Royal VA
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I want to plant some strawberries this year. I am interested in the strawberry tree. I know that strawberries require fast draining soil but it looks like the tree idea would be drain and stay to dry at least on top.

I recently put in a few raised beds using the hugelkultur practices on a small scale. I have considered using this idea as well but I would to tier the beds.

Any links, pictures, or ideas?

Thanks!
 
Rion Mather
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The strawberry tree?
 
Willy Walker
Posts: 89
Location: Foot of the Mountain, Front Royal VA
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chicken fungi hugelkultur
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Google the strawberry tree.

 
S Bengi
Posts: 1355
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Which one of these strawberry tree or do you mean the regular groundcover strawberry?

Arbutus menziesii (Ericaceae), commonly known as the Pacific Madrone, native to the west coast of North America;
Arbutus unedo (Ericaceae), native to western Europe and the Mediterranean basin;
Muntingia calabura (Malvaceae), native to the American tropics;
Myrica rubra (Myricaceae), referred to as the Chinese strawberry tree.
 
Emma Fredsdotter
Posts: 32
Location: France (zone 8b-9)
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Since you start off talking about actual strawberries, I get the impression that you're not talking about strawberry trees so much as some kind of strawberry pot or structure...?

Maybe some kind of strawberry tower or even a more classical strawberry pot? Or maybe you're thinking of some kind of structure made with climbing strawberries?
 
Rion Mather
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It would work with strawberry plants. They love hugelkultur. The roots are shallow so it doesn't take much work to make them happy in either a tower structure or beds.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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Location: North Central Michigan
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strawberries shouldn't be around PRUNUS (for some reason, not sure why). I have some coming in spring and was going to plant them near prunus, now I have to figure out a different place to put the little buggers. I know they can take a woodsy edge as wild strawberries grow in shade and acid soil
 
Emma Fredsdotter
Posts: 32
Location: France (zone 8b-9)
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Brenda Groth wrote:strawberries shouldn't be around PRUNUS (for some reason, not sure why). I have some coming in spring and was going to plant them near prunus, now I have to figure out a different place to put the little buggers. I know they can take a woodsy edge as wild strawberries grow in shade and acid soil

That's interesting, Brenda. Any idea how close "around' means? Naturally, the spot I've cornered off for cherries, plums and peaches is over by the land I've earmarked for what I currently call my asparagus and strawberry terraces...
 
Julie Anderson
Posts: 65
Location: Zone 9B Santa Rosa, CA
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Emma Fredsdotter wrote:
Brenda Groth wrote:strawberries shouldn't be around PRUNUS (for some reason, not sure why). I have some coming in spring and was going to plant them near prunus, now I have to figure out a different place to put the little buggers. I know they can take a woodsy edge as wild strawberries grow in shade and acid soil

That's interesting, Brenda. Any idea how close "around' means? Naturally, the spot I've cornered off for cherries, plums and peaches is over by the land I've earmarked for what I currently call my asparagus and strawberry terraces...


We have an established strawberry bed that is about 8 feet away from our cherry tree. Both are doing well. From spring to fall, there is generally a mix of different plants between the cherry tree and the strawberry bed. I don't know if this makes a difference. This mixture varies year to year, but usually includes grapes, lettuces, brassicas, squashes (both summer and winter), cilantro (which is established as a "weed" in our yard, and tomatoes. The strawberry bed is a monoculture (although with several varieties so it bears throughout the summer. It was established by my husband before I got interested in Permaculture.

He still wants to maintain some of his monoculture raised beds, while I am busy making seed mixtures and broadcasting them willy nilly throughout the yard. I have had a lot of success with my mixtures of greens, radishes, carrots, cilantro and lettuces. The hugel Kultur bed I established last Fall has a polyculture. The new one I am building and will plant for spring will too. We'll see if I can get him converted over to polyculture. At any rate, I am establishing areas of polyculture all around his raised beds.

Julie
 
andrew curr
Posts: 288
Location: Deepwater northern New South wales Australia
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S Bengi wrote:Which one of these strawberry tree or do you mean the regular groundcover strawberry?

Arbutus menziesii (Ericaceae), commonly known as the Pacific Madrone, native to the west coast of North America;
Arbutus unedo (Ericaceae), native to western Europe and the Mediterranean basin;
Muntingia calabura (Malvaceae), native to the American tropics;
Myrica rubra (Myricaceae), referred to as the Chinese strawberry tree.
what about the hymalayan strawberry tree i didnt have much success with them frost knocked them
i think strawbebbies like it Around pine thees
 
chris glazier
Posts: 11
Location: noth western michigan, petoskey
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Cornus kousa or Benthamidia kousa
Ive fallen for this tree this past yr. edible but not super tastey (plain) birds love it.
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1355
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Strawberry plants are only good for 3 years you have to replace them with a herb because they makes the soil have too much nematodes you could try extending that to 5yrs with onion family and non runninng strawberry (alpine/wild) .
 
Angelika Maier
Posts: 690
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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We plant strawberry runners as groundcover everywere, I didn't know that they have to stay away from the prunus family though. Like that the birds and the kids have more work finding them. Some are in shade too. What is usually called strawberry tree is arbutus unedo and it is said to taste pretty terrible.
 
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