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Is there any green that does well throughout the summer?  RSS feed

 
john muckleroy jr
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Location: nacogdoches,texas
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The lady I buy my spinich from just informed me that it would not be available thru the summer because of the heat.I was wondering if there are any greens that thrive in the summer heat?
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
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Location: zone 7
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Amaranth, lambs quarters, dandelion, purslane, sweet potato to name a few.
 
Renate Howard
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We had Red Russian Kale go throughout the summer with good flavor. Chard is another, and cooks up a lot like spinach. Then there's New Zealand Spinach. Hard to germinate but then a tough plant.
 
Alder Burns
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Summer greens in the Deep South are a challenge...many recommended for summer use elsewhere (like chard, New Zealand spinach, lamb's quarters, dandelion, etc.) either won't grow at all through the summer or become impossibly fibrous and/or bitter. You need to consider truly tropical vegetables, with the exception of collards and possibly kale. Sweet potato greens are excellent cooked, and many people don't know you can eat them. My favorites from 20 years in Georgia are Indian or Malabar spinach (Basella), kangkong or water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica), and Surinam spinach or Florida lettuce (Talinum triangulare). They will all thrive on any amount of heat and humidity, provided they get enough moisture, and are useful both as salad and as cooked greens. Kangkong can be hard to find....try seed companies that specialize in Oriental vegetables. Talinum is as far as I know not available commercially anywhere....it's a West African weed now found throughout the Caribbean and Central America, and, sporadically, in central and southern Florida. The seeds of all three, like other really tropical species like eggplant and peppers, need a lot of warmth (80-90) to germinate well at all.....
 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1976
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
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Common mallow is a delicious "weed" green that does well through the summer here in New England. I don't know how it would be in the south
 
Miles Flansburg
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Might also be able to modify the climate a little with shading or misting water, to give yourself a little more time. Sort of like how a green house gives you more heated time in spring and fall.
 
John Saltveit
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Curly mallow is my personal favorite here. Never bitter. A favorite of Thomas Jefferson and George Washington. I think paying attention to ones climate is key on this topic.
Good King Henry, Salad burnet, tilia cordata, and black salsify are others. Eric Toensmeier's book "Perennial Vegetables" is a good one for this topic. I agree more shade and water in hotter climates.
John S
PDX OR
 
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