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dried flowers

 
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I would think that this would be a good business line for polycultures. 

Has anyone fiddled with this market? 

How long can a bunch of dried flowers last?  And are there any restrictions for internet sales?

 
                    
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I know a woman who makes several thousand dollars a year selling dried flower wreaths in San Fran.  Not her main enterprise, but nothing to sneeze at either.  I'm not so sure a simple bouquet would be as popular, as you can't hang it on a wall and forgitaboutit.  I guess you could stick it in a vase and forgitaboutit...but it's not as out of the way as on a wall. 

I had this idea for making wreaths that double as seed sowers.  As in, enjoy the wreath all winter, then toss it outside and it'll make a flower patch!  Most dried flowers do not retain their seeds....so I was thinking about ways of sneaking seed balls or something into the wreath.  The lady I mentioned uses wire and styrofoam as the hidden base, and that obviously would not go so well with my idea.  I made a bunch of bamboo wreath skeletons...and never got further. 

She grew specific varieties for the wreaths, flowers that dry sturdily.  Baby's breath, straw flowers, eucalyptus branches, etc. 
 
pollinator
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It seems like a third of a long luffa gourd (cut long-wise) would be a good replacement for the styrofoam. A fluffy sort of seedball mix, maybe paper fiber, would probably help keep the weight of the wreath down.

I think some varieties keep their shape for years with careful handling, and keep their color indefinitely if kept out of the sun. Lavender and cinnamon stay fragrant for many months, perhaps a year.

I read an article a couple years ago where the author discussed an addiction to poppyseed tea, sourced from online dry-flower companies. It sounds like the restrictions are practically nonexistent.
 
paul wheaton
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I like the idea of embedded seeds.  The rest of the wreath acts as mulch!
 
                    
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yeah exactly!  Maybe I should follow through with that idea.....someday.  Good tip with the luffa gourd, Joel, thanks!
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