• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Where to purchase Osage Orange and Honey Locust Saplings?

 
Lina Ackerman
Posts: 9
Location: Michigan
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I live in Michigan in the US (right near Canada zone 5b) and I'm interested in using both Osage Orange and Spiney Honey Locust in a living hedge. I'm running into difficulty with my planning however, as I cannot find a nursery that sells either locally and a onlien search only turns up the non-spiney honey Locusts for yard candy. Any suggestions for a reputable national nurseries that someone could offer?
 
Michael Cox
Posts: 1574
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
45
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Osage Orange is supposed to grow really well from seed. One fruit contains hundreds of seeds so if you crush the fruit into a slurry you can pour the slurry in a trench along the line of your new hedge. Enough will supposedly sprout that your hedge will be established in one go.

It would be massively cheaper to get 1000 or so seed than 1000 or so rooted plants to transplant (both plant costs and labour costs getting them established). I've seen them for sale on ebay for example.

Regarding the locust - if you have suitable groves near you you could go and transplant a few suckers. They frequently send up new stems from their roots many 10s of meters from the original trunk. They are especially prone to this where the ground has been disturbed and the roots cut and damaged. To take this approach to the next level, you could try digging up a few meters of root cutting it into foot long sections and planting it in the ground. These root cuttings may well shoot for you. (I've not tested this - but it wouldn't cost you more than an hour of your time).
 
John Elliott
pollinator
Posts: 2310
77
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Purchase?!? This is the time of year to be taking cuttings. Whenever you go out, take your pruning shears with you and be ready to snip. When you see a good candidate, give it a trim. Here a propagation protocol on how to do it.
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you want to buy them look at lawyer nursery. You have to buy in bulk.
 
Lina Ackerman
Posts: 9
Location: Michigan
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
John Elliott wrote:Purchase?!? This is the time of year to be taking cuttings. Whenever you go out, take your pruning shears with you and be ready to snip. When you see a good candidate, give it a trim. Here a propagation protocol on how to do it.


He he he, well all the Honey Lucust I come across up here is thornless! I don't have any I could trim up for anyone.
 
Adam Moore
Posts: 121
Location: Mansfield, Ohio Zone 5b percip 44"
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have grown Osage Orange from seed. The secret is to let the grapefruit sized fruit that looks like a brain sit out in a tray all winter. By spring it will look like a shrunken black gooey brain. You will need to soak it in water to help seperate the seeds. The seeds grow really well. The Osage is very thorny when young. If you let it grow into a full size tree then not so thorny anymore. I have several huge ones in the area that never seem to have fruit. I have had luck at old cemeteries that have some with fruit. Look for where there might have been an old hedge row a hundred years ago. I have two young saplings growing right now. I wanted to grow them because I wanted to see how thorny they are when young. They exceeded expectations. Oikios Tree crops have honey locusts with thorns. And they are in Michigan! http://www.oikostreecrops.com/product.asp?strParents=0&CAT_ID=0&P_ID=746&strPageHistory=search&numSearchStartRecord=1
 
R Scott
Posts: 3305
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
32
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I believe osage have male and female trees, so you will get some w/o fruit.
 
Rick O'Grady
Posts: 3
Location: ohio
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It just so happens that today I was picking up hedge apples (osage) and honey locust pods (thorny) so i could spread these to other locations on my new pre-permaprop. id be willing to do some swappin for some nuts to propagate or pretty much consider anything. Just tell me how many.
 
R Scott
Posts: 3305
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
32
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We should start a pod exchange. Swap flat-rate boxes of various varieties.

I am saving hedge apples this year, but am reluctant to share until I am confident they will propagate. I still need to go and collect honey locust and Kentucky coffee pods.
 
Rick O'Grady
Posts: 3
Location: ohio
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I agree, we should. If you want some honey locust let me know. I'll have to go out to the site before they get buried in snow or the deer eat them. I just got some organic apples from Azure Standard and I'll try to plant those. I figure it can't hurt to try.
 
Rick O'Grady
Posts: 3
Location: ohio
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hhmmmm? I guess I hit some highlighting button?
 
Adam Baker
Posts: 18
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ive got tons of osage orange... 60 or so gallons collected at the moment.

If somebody wants some shoot me a PM.
you want to trade something ill pay shipping. Just want some? shipping is on you.
 
allen lumley
pollinator
Posts: 4154
Location: Northern New York Zone4-5 the OUTER 'RONDACs percip 36''
58
books fungi hugelkultur solar wofati woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
John Elliot : Thanks for the link to the Propagation protocol, while originally native in New York Osage orange was merely considered a superior boxwood as near as I can Tell !
Almost impossible to find, and all I can find appear to have been planted ! Big AL!
 
Allen Herod
Posts: 18
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I bet it would be VERY easy to propogate Osage cuttings. My land is covered with them, big and small. If you cut it down it grows back like a weed unless the stump is dug up or burned... Different topic I know but has anyone ever used the Osage wood in any kind of timber framing? If so, I would love to see pics. I have some that are HUGE and have surprisingly straight sections. Many of the big ones don't seem to be producing fruit anymore but younger trees near them are.


One more thing, my old redneck neighbor calls it a "M. F.'er Tree" (ok a little more french than that).... Cause "It don't matter how ya grab it, that mother F 'er is gonna stick ya!" haha
 
Daniel McGinnis
Posts: 18
Location: Kansas City Kansas
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I can box up and send honey locust seed pods to whoever needs them as well I know I'm looking to put in a osage orange hedge myself this spring
 
Mike Cantrell
Posts: 530
Location: Mid-Michigan
28
bee books duck food preservation forest garden hunting solar trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Allen Herod wrote:I bet it would be VERY easy to propogate Osage cuttings. My land is covered with them, big and small. .... I have some that are HUGE and have surprisingly straight sections.


I don't know about timber framing, but bowyers will pay through the nose for straight-grained osage. (For example, at Trad Gang (tradgang.com) and Paleo Planet (http://paleoplanet69529.yuku.com/forums/).)

If you've got an abundance, it could be the home-based business everyone dreams of.
 
C. Letellier
Posts: 221
Location: Greybull WY north central WY zone 4 bordering on 3
13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Check with your local soil conservation service. In WY at least there is a yearly order for wind break trees that is cheaper than most nurseries. They are fall ordered and spring delivered. The catch is most require a minimum order of at least 50 trees and prepayment. But they are nearly always cheaper than commercial nurseries on price per tree. I know osage orange was on the list but don't remember if honey locust was or not.

Otherwise my preferred commercial online source for trees is Musser Forests

The have a huge variety of trees and have been really good to deal with through the years. And their prices have mostly been competitive with any other source I have found. I just looked and they list honeylocust(theirs is thorn less which might be a problem) and osage orange. It has been a few years since I ordered from them but their service was good and reliable and the plants packed well when they arrived.

 
Peter Smith
Posts: 83
Location: NEPA
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Post by: Jordan Lowery, volunteer
on Nov 20, 2013 15:42:39
If you want to buy them look at lawyer nursery. You have to buy in bulk.

Jordan, have you ordered from them? Will they sell to an individual, or just businesses?
 
Grant Schultz
Posts: 219
Location: Iowa City, Iowa Zone 5
20
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Lina,

My nursery and farm are in Iowa (zone 5b). We have thousands of Osage Orange, Chinese Chestnut, Hawthorne, black locust, and other trees for living fences and hedges.

http://www.versaland.com/

Check out our in-stock. We ship bare root in Spring.

here's the inventory spreadsheet:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AjiQ8ND-k60TdFNYZWhRT2JxN3VQNTh3LVdJY2xCZGc#gid=0

Grant
 
Fire me boy! Cool, soothing, shameless self promotion:
Got Permaculture games? Yes! 66 cards, infinite possibilities::
www.FoodForestCardGame
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic