• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Ideas for rainwater cistern that is non-plastic  RSS feed

 
Emma O'Con
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Does anyone have any ideas for a rainwater cistern that is not plastic? Stainless steel seems like a good option but would be rather expensive. I am opposed to concrete because of all the coal ash that is used in it these days. What did people do historically? Any suggestions or links to information would be great! Thanks!
 
Angelika Maier
pollinator
Posts: 985
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Historically it was steel (if you consider the Aussie tanks as historical), today steel tanks come with plastic liners.
 
R Scott
Posts: 3351
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
32
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Stainless tanks can be found used--dairy, winery or beer brewery, food factories, etc.--for decent prices. Best deals I have found are on Craigslist, people just want it gone and not trying to make max $$. Still not as cheap as poly tanks, but not ridiculous.

 
Angelika Maier
pollinator
Posts: 985
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That is a really good idea!
 
Rosco Heber
Posts: 34
Location: Arkansas Ozarks
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In the big city you might find scrap yards with stainless areas. I remember in Kansas City seeing a mountain of stainless in one yard. Here in the Ozarks people look for stainless tanks for a bit of distillation and they are very hard to find.
 
Angelika Maier
pollinator
Posts: 985
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You might even make one out of ferrocement, or stainless steel. Historically they were made out of brick I think there are still systems in the desert of
 
Stephen Lloyd
Posts: 37
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ferrocement is the way to go, in my opinion. I really enjoy it. I will be making some ferrocement water tanks of my own soon. I made a root cellar of ferrocement and earthbags. Earthbags are another option, but ferrocement would probably be much quicker. My understanding is that the water will for a time be alkaline due to the concrete, but after a year or two, it won't affect the water whatsoever. I haven't looked too much into what is generally used to seal the tanks, or if it is always necessary. In my own tank, I will avoid sealers if at all possible. I would think that a rich mixture of portland cement on the interior and then painting the exterior would do the trick.

 
D. Logan
gardener
Posts: 586
Location: Soutwest Ohio
100
books food preservation forest garden rabbit tiny house
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have a German friend I met on the Appalachian Trail who talked about his own rain water catchment system. Apparently he build the cistern from huge ceramic rings made for that purpose. The bottom one had a base and the top one had a top with a manhole. After placing them one atop another, they were sealed at the joints to prevent leaks and it is now a semi-permanent feature of his home that holds a huge amount of water where it can't freeze.
 
The overall mission is to change the world. When you've done that, then you can read this tiny ad:
FT Position Available: Affiliate Manager Who Loves Permaculture & Homesteading
https://permies.com/t/69742/FT-Position-Affiliate-Manager-Loves
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!