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anyone growing flowers for market?

 
Ann Torrence
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Location: Torrey, UT; 6,840'/2085m; 7.5" precip; 125 frost-free days
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One of my 5 goals is to sell something at our tiny farmers' market this summer, as a practice run for when we have our fruit products. We have a "real" farmer who brings in veg and goat cheese; he started the market and I'm not going to compete with him. But no one sells flowers. I'm going to try it. Annuals, but if it works, it would be pretty easy to add things like echinacea, lilies, etc to the mainframe project. And our market is small, mostly weekend homeowners and retirees, so it's more of having a presence until the fruit comes in and it's not a huge investment to try it. Worst case scenario is that I get to hang out with my neighbors for a couple hours a week and fill my house with cut flowers.

Anyone done this? Tips?
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5615
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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I sold flowers at our small farmer's market and they did well...I made really small bouquets of marigolds, zinnias, echinacea, wild flowers, anise hysspo, small sunflowers...things I was growing anyway. At first I did it just to add something pretty to my table at the market. I found that buying really inexpensive small glasses and bottles at the thrift store worked well and helped sales...folks liked having them ready to go. I was surprised, because I thought my flowers were very 'common' and everyone grows them
 
Ann Torrence
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Posts: 1191
Location: Torrey, UT; 6,840'/2085m; 7.5" precip; 125 frost-free days
110
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Great idea on the containers! I need to check on my anise hyssop seedlings. I love that plant
 
Christopher G Williams
Posts: 69
Location: Ossineke, MI
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It really depends on your market; if people have money for flowers they will buy them... We used to do a very large market in a wealthy university town and there were 4 or 5 large flower sellers that seemed to do brisk business. Compare that to our local market in a small, economically depressed, town; we tried to sell flowers but people were much more interested in bargain hunting for cucumbers and tomatoes. We would inevitably end up cutting the price by half or 3/4 and still taking them home with us. You just have to know your market I guess...

All that said, you don't have too much to lose. Flowers are pretty easy to grow and beautiful to see in the garden, even if no one is buying them. Plus you generally don't have the extra labor in cleaning and packaging as much as say, lettuce or the like.
 
Michael Cox
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Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
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One way of preserving a flower crops is drying the petals for confetti. People mail order petals for weddings and the like - great. Use for petals from blemished flowers, especially roses.

We dried our own for our wedding.
 
Audrey Barton
Posts: 22
Location: Mid-Michigan
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A few veggie vendors sell country bouquets at the local markets, and long-stem sunflowers. These aren't their main money makers, but they do add a good bit of cheer to the stalls until pumpkins come into season.

Their prices are low ($3-4), and the bouquets are full of classic and bizarre flowers. They're usually displayed in old canning jars, and I'm sure they'd sell the jar for an extra dollar or so. It's a simple, easy filler -- but I don't think a seller focusing on flowers would do well in the Mid-Michigan markets I frequent.

Good luck!
 
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